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 Information Entries for Mt. Belford and Name History

Name History (Mt. Belford)



Title: Naming of Mt. Belford

Entered by: 14erFred

Added: 05/14/2010, Last Updated: 05/14/2010

Sources: Borneman, W.R., & Lampert, L.J. (1978). A climbing guide to Colorado's Fourteeners. Boulder, CO: Pruett Publishing Company. Eberhart, P., & Schmuck, P. (1970). The Fourteeners: Colorado's great mountains. Chicago: The Swallow Press.

This peak was named by unknown miners for James Burns Belford (September 28, 1837 January 10, 1910), an associate justice of the supreme court of Colorado and Colorado's first U.S. congressman. Belford was a strong and vocal advocate of the free coinage of silver, and his bright red hair, fiery speeches, and flamboyant persona earned him the nickname of the "Red-Headed Rooster of the Rockies." Evidently, the local miners associated Belford's name with the reddish outcropping of rock on the summit of the mountain. Belford is buried in Riverside Cemetery in Denver.

Name History (Mt. Oxford)



Title: Naming of Mt. Oxford

Entered by: 14erFred

Added: 05/17/2010, Last Updated: 05/17/2010

Sources: Borneman, W.R., & Lampert, L.J. (1978). A climbing guide to Colorado's Fourteeners. Boulder, CO: Pruett Publishing Company. Eberhart, P., & Schmuck, P. (1970). The Fourteeners: Colorado's great mountains. Chicago: The Swallow Press. Hart, J.L.J. (1977). Fourteen thousand feet: A history of the naming and early ascents of the high Colorado peaks (Second Edition). Denver, CO: The Colorado Mountain Club.

This mountain is one of a group of five Collegiate Peak 14ers in the south central Sawatch Range of the Colorado Rockies that also includes Harvard, Princeton, Yale, and Columbia. In 1925, Stephen Hart and Albert Ellingwood first attracted attention to this unnamed summit when they hauled surveying instruments to the summits of Harvard and Columbia to confirm the mountain's 14,000-foot- plus elevation. Then in completing the landmark 1925 first edition of his history of the Colorado 14ers, John L. Jerome Hart (Stephen Hart's brother) discovered that this mountain had never been named. Accordingly, he christened the peak "Mt. Oxford," in keeping with the tradition of naming Collegiate Peak 14ers after institutions of higher education, and in honor of the imminent London university that both his brother and Ellingwood had attended (Hart, 1977, p. 19). Oxford was the last of the Collegiate Peak 14ers to be named.
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