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 Information Entries for Mt. Eolus and Name History

Name History (Mt. Eolus)



Title: Naming of Mt. Eolus

Entered by: 14erFred

Added: 05/14/2010, Last Updated: 05/14/2010

Sources: Hart, J.L.J. (1977). Fourteen thousand feet: A history of the naming and early ascents of the high Colorado peaks (Second Edition). Denver, CO: The Colorado Mountain Club. Smith, W. (1936). Smith's Smaller Classical Dictionary and Atlas of Classical Geography. (Dent's Double Volumes: Volume 1). London: J.M. Dent & Sons.

Mount Eolus was named for the Greek God of the Winds, Ĉolus, by the Hayden Survey of 1874.

In his classic Odyssey, Homer told the story of Aeolus, whom Zeus had made Keeper of the Winds, and who dwells on a floating island named Aeolia. To help Odysseus sail home to Ithaca, Aeolus gives him a favorable west wind, along with a bag in which he has trapped all the unfavorable winds. Being curious or perhaps thinking the bag contained valuable treasures, Odysseus' companions open the bag, and the unfavorable winds escape, driving their boat back to Aeolia, where Aeolus sends them away in anger. In his classic Aeneid, Virgil, claimed that Aeolus dwells on one of the Aeolian Islands north of Sicily, where he keeps the winds imprisoned in a huge cave.


Name History (North Eolus)



Title: Naming of North Eolus Peak

Entered by: 14erFred

Added: 05/17/2010, Last Updated: 05/17/2010

Sources: Hart, J.L.J. (1977). Fourteen thousand feet: A history of the naming and early ascents of the high Colorado peaks (Second Edition). Denver, CO: The Colorado Mountain Club. Smith, W. (1936). Smith's Smaller Classical Dictionary and Atlas of Classical Geography. (Dent's Double Volumes: Volume 1). London: J.M. Dent & Sons.

North Eolus's namesake, Mount Eolus, was named for the Greek God of the Winds, Ĉolus, by the Hayden Survey of 1874.

In his classic Odyssey, Homer told the story of Aeolus, whom Zeus had made Keeper of the Winds, and who dwells on a floating island named Aeolia. To help Odysseus sail home to Ithaca, Aeolus gives him a favorable west wind, along with a bag in which he has trapped all the unfavorable winds. Being curious or perhaps thinking the bag contained valuable treasures, Odysseus' companions open the bag, and the unfavorable winds escape, driving their boat back to Aeolia, where Aeolus sends them away in anger. In his classic Aeneid, Virgil, claimed that Aeolus dwells on one of the Aeolian Islands north of Sicily, where he keeps the winds imprisoned in a huge cave.


Name History (San Juan Mountains)



Title: Eolus

Entered by: wojtekrychlik

Added: 01/21/2014, Last Updated: 01/21/2014


Aeolus was the ruler of the winds, according to Greek mythology.

Name History (Sunlight Peak)



Title: Naming of Sunlight Peak

Entered by: 14erFred

Added: 05/14/2010, Last Updated: 05/14/2010

Sources: Hart, J.L.J. (1977). Fourteen thousand feet: A history of the naming and early ascents of the high Colorado peaks (Second Edition). Denver, CO: The Colorado Mountain Club.

Sunlight was named by the U.S. Geological Survey when they mapped the Needles Mountains in 1902.

Name History (Windom Peak)



Title: Naming of Windom Peak

Entered by: 14erFred

Added: 05/14/2010, Last Updated: 05/14/2010

Sources: Hart, J.L.J. (1977). Fourteen thousand feet: A history of the naming and early ascents of the high Colorado peaks (Second Edition). Denver, CO: The Colorado Mountain Club.

Windom was named by the U.S. Geological Survey when they mapped the Needles Mountains in 1902. The namesake of Windom was William Windom (1827-1891), congressman, senator, and Secretary of the Treasury under President James Garfield.
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