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What are you reading?

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby MonGoose » Tue Feb 12, 2013 3:47 pm

I read "Endurance" over the Christmas break and found it unbelievable what those guys went through. It truly is an amazing story.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby gb » Tue Feb 12, 2013 4:04 pm

Jim Davies wrote:I'm currently working my way through Fred Beckey's 100 Favorite North American Climbs, which I won in a contest from gb's blog (sponsored by Patagonia - thanks, Frank!). This is a massive, impressive, coffee-table book; be sure to warm up before trying to lift it. The preface is a climbing bio of Beckey, who must be the greatest American climber ever, starting with a 47-day expedition to do the second ascent of Mount Waddington at age 18, accompanied by his 16-year-old brother! I haven't read many of the individual route descriptions, but they're generally well-illustrated and have interesting stories. It will probably take me years to skim my way through the individual route descriptions, but it'll be fun (I'm unlikely to ever climb any of them). Available as an e-book if you don't have the storage space. :)

One interesting feature is the detailed route descriptions and guidebook-like access and caveats on each climb. I'm trying to imagine anyone carrying this book on a climb, and failing.


Glad you're enjoying it!

Currently on an Afghanistan kick- Finished "The places in between" a while back- the author walks across Afghanistan alone right after 9/11.

Now I'm reading "Ghost wars", basically an overview of the tug of war between Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, the USSR, and the USA for virtual control of Afghanistan.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby Flips » Tue Feb 12, 2013 9:09 pm

Finished Altas Shrugged by Ayn Rand. Always wanted to read this sucker because I heard it referred to so much. Sounds intimidating... a 1000 page book that integrates her philosophies of ethics, metaphysics, epistemology, politics, economics and sex, but really a fun read that keeps you going chapter to chapter. Interesting to note that Colorado is a main setting along with New York and Philadephia. Each named character is important, so pay attention to their roles and don't dismiss any as incidental.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby Hungry Jack » Wed Feb 13, 2013 7:15 am

I finished The Lost Cyclist a few months ago and recommend it highly.

Just finished When the Rivers Run Dry and also enjoyed it. I was worried it would rehash Reisner's Cadillac Desert, but it takes a more global view. If you are interested in water policy, read both.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby Jim Davies » Wed Feb 13, 2013 10:15 am

Hungry Jack wrote:Just finished When the Rivers Run Dry and also enjoyed it. I was worried it would rehash Reisner's Cadillac Desert, but it takes a more global view. If you are interested in water policy, read both.

Coincidentally, I just read a Mountain Gazette article that proposes a more pragmatic view of our water management policies.
The Colorado: First River of the Anthropocene by George Sibley.
Jonathan Waterman’s recent book, “Running Dry: A Journey from Source to Sea Down the Colorado River,” hit the tipping point for me. Not because it’s any worse than any of the rest of the books about the Colorado River; it’s not. But it’s just the same old sad story, a mingling of lamentation, nostalgia and repugnance for a river presumed to be ruined if we don’t stop … whatever.
Some people are afraid of heights. Not me, I'm afraid of white blood cells.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby Hungry Jack » Wed Feb 13, 2013 11:44 am

I should also add that Little Hungry (age 2.5) and I read Cat in the Hat last night. It is an epic tale of adventure that you should read before you leave this earthly plane.
I need more dehydrogenase.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby Hungry Jack » Wed Feb 13, 2013 11:47 am

kansas wrote:
susanjoypaul wrote:But my favorite adventure book is "Endurance" by Alfred Lansing, which chronicles Ernest Shackleton's 1914 attempt to cross Antarctica.


At Fletch's insistence, I just finished this one.

I'd have to say it's near the top of my list, if not the top. Never again will I feel like I have the right to complain or whine about much of anything.


That story is stunning. The sea journey from Elephant Island to South Georgia Island alone is mind-bending enough. The fact that the entire crew survived has to put it on par, if not above, the survival of the Corps of Discovery.
I need more dehydrogenase.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby Bill Cummings » Wed Feb 13, 2013 8:32 pm

I haven't seen this one mentioned here yet--sorry if I missed it: The Week magazine gives a glowing review to David Roberts' Alone on the Ice: The Greatest Survival Story in the history of Exploration. That subtitle comes directly from Sir Edmund Hillary. It's about Douglas Mawson's forced 1912-13 solo trek of 100 miles across Antarctica. Haven't read it yet, but it sounds great.

Also have enjoyed Endurance and The Last Place on Earth (on the Amundsen--Scott race to the South Pole). Night of the Grizzlies is good, too, if you don't mind a story that's kind of, um...grizzly.
Bill "Blind Willie" Cummings

"God loves you just the way you are. But He loves you way too much to let you stay that way." --"Junebug"
"You can't argue with the truth when it comes up and bites you on the buttocks." --Peter Lang

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby wooderson » Wed Feb 13, 2013 8:59 pm

Bill Cummings wrote: Night of the Grizzlies is good, too, if you don't mind a story that's kind of, um...grizzly.


+1... this is a great read. Just don't read it while sleeping in your tent at Many Glacier CG unless you want to lay there all night paralyzed with fear (not that I've ever done that, of course).

Another good bear book is Stephen Herrero's Bear Attacks. Ditto the above.

I believe both of these are two of lord helmut's personal favorites....

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby Kiefer » Wed Feb 13, 2013 9:04 pm

Image Image
"Wisdom comes from making mistakes.
Experience, is the knowledge of knowing what to do when one makes a mistake and wisdom,
stems from the changes we go through while learning from those mistakes."

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby Oman » Wed Feb 13, 2013 10:00 pm

Last ones I liked:
The Cellist of Sarajevo by Steven Galloway. A sniper is assigned to keep alive a cellist who vows to play a street concert a day for each person killed in a bread line by a bomb during the Bosnian civil war. Beautiful writing, great plot.

In the Time of Butterflies by Julia Alvarez. Fictionalized account of four Dominican sisters who take on their country's bloodthirsty dictator in the 1940s and 50s. A little cartoony, but still moving.

The End of the Affair by Graham Greene. Somehow got through college without reading this account of a love triangle during World War II London. Literature with a thumper plot. Greene is a stud.

The Round House by Louise Erdrich. National Book Award winner. Holy crap. Boy investigates the rape of his mother on the Ojibwe / Chippewa reservation of North Dakota. Made me remember how much I miss Tony Hillerman, though this book may be even better.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby highpilgrim » Thu Feb 14, 2013 12:17 pm

Hero: The Life and Legend of Lawrence of Arabia by Michael Korda. It's a compelling biography of a real badass, T. E. Lawrence. At 5' 4" tall, Lawrence was diminutive physically, but was a giant in terms of what he accomplished and the risks he took and challenges he overcame. It was interesting to learn and now partly understand some of the formative process that helped to create the mess that is the current middle east.
Call on God, but row away from the rocks.
Hunter S Thompson

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