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Memory Lane

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Memory Lane

Postby SurfNTurf » Fri Jun 22, 2012 9:59 am

Well, things have certainly been "entertaining" around here the past week or two, eh? Sometimes when things get too serious or heated I've found it's best to take a step back and have a good laugh. And who better to laugh at than yourself?

One source of drama has been why people go back to delete their post history. Well, because they don't want people to see something or some things they've posted, of course! That got me thinking: of my 700+ posts over three years, I wonder how many I regret? I didn't go through all of them, fairly content that I don't have anything to "take back" from the recent past. But what about 2009, with posts I scarcely remember?

Another (small and minor) rift has been the experienced crowd vs. those just getting started. The value of Quandary and Sherman summer TRs, etc. As peak lists grow we admittedly sometimes lose sight of one very evident, obvious truth: we all were newbies once. So let's take a trip down memory lane and remind ourselves that everyone starts somewhere...

These are posts that for one reason or another made me crack a smile or shake my head. Anyone else want to share?

SurfNTurf, the Routefinder (First-ever post Aug. 27, 2009)
SurfNTurf wrote:I nearly made the same mistake on Sneffels last Sunday. I began climbing toward the first notch I saw, maybe 1/3 of the way up the gully, and the route immediately became tougher. Definitely Class 3. Luckily before I'd made it too far up the wrong route I saw a pair of guys coming down from the summit from farther up the main gully. I course-corrected back to easier terrain and found the V-notch to be very apparent, as someone said earlier, near the top of the gully.

To avoid confusion I'd recommend staying in the center or to the right of the gully until you get more than halfway up, then start looking for the notch on the left. I'm glad I was able to find my way, because it was my first 14er summit!


It's worth noting that my undeveloped route-finding skills led to a non-summit, as I somehow couldn't find a way around the terrain past the V-notch. I thought I was on the top, but upon further at-home review discovered there was an easy path around the seemingly impassable rock gendarmes to the true summit. I'll return for you in September, my dear Sneffels...

After (actually) summiting Windom, Redcloud and Sunshine, I moved to Boston for nearly a year and stopped posting. We pick up the following summer...

SurfNTurf, the Brave (Aug. 14, 2010)
SurfNTurf wrote:Anyone else want to do this (the Sawtooth)? My normal hiking partners work during the week and/or aren't comfortable with scrambling. It would be my first Class 3, but I've done Class 2+ on both Windom and Sneffels, and I rock climb. I could also be talked into Kelso Ridge...


We'd only make Bierstadt that day, turning around because of storms before the Sawtooth. Brian Thomas and I did Kelso Ridge about a week later for our first of many man-dates. Two year anniversary coming up Brian! <3

SurfNTurf, the Overthinking Gear Whore (Oct. 22, 2010)
SurfNTurf wrote:I want to start snowshoeing and spring climbing this season. The prospect of all the gear I have to buy has literally kept me up at night. I'll need a shell (debating hard or soft), gaiters, ski goggles, a base layer, shell pants, insulating pants, gloves and an ice axe, at the absolute minimum. An Avy 1 class, too. I figure I can rent showshoes, and I think plastic boots/crampons can also be rented. For the time being. I've spent entire afternoons browsing gear websites and reading reviews. I've been known to ride my bike down to REI or drive to Bent Gate just to try something on, knowing I can't afford it.


Apparently I acquired a lot of that gear over the following months, because by January I was ready to tackle Quandary...

SurfNTurf, the Mountaineer (Jan. 6, 2011)
SurfNTurf wrote:I'd like to tag along for this. It would be my first winter ascent, but I believe I have all the necessary gear (will rent snowshoes, I guess), and I definitely have the necessary desire! I'd be coming from downtown Denver, would be down to carpool from here or meet at the Dino lot. Probably won't camp and drive up early that morning.


After conquering my first winter 14er, of course, I had arrived. The rest, as they say, is history. Hopefully this helps speed along everyone's "productive" Friday at work.
Many Miles to Go (Blog)

“There are two kinds of climbers: those who climb because their heart sings when they’re in the mountains, and all the rest.” - Alex Lowe

"There have been joys too great to describe in words, and there have been griefs upon which I cannot dare to dwell; and with those in mind I say, 'Climb if you will, but remember that courage and strength are nought without prudence, and that a momentary negligence may destroy the happiness of a lifetime. Do nothing in haste, look well to each step, and from the beginning think what may be the end.'" - Edward Whymper

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Re: Memory Lane

Postby Rich H » Fri Jun 22, 2012 10:18 am

this is one of my first posts... in 2008

Rich H wrote:I hiked Sun Dog / Sunshine / Redcloud this last Monday 30th and came across a spruce tree(s) not taller than my knee on the ridge between Sun Dog & Sunshine....at an elevation of approx 13,300'.... It is the highest tree I have seen alive in Colorado.

I was wondering if any one else has crossed paths with a tree at such elevations...

Cheers,
Rich



I often wonder if that tree is still up there and I have yet to see another at that altitude.
"If more of us valued food and cheer above hoarded gold, it would be a much merrier world."

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Re: Memory Lane

Postby Fisching » Fri Jun 22, 2012 11:17 am

This isn't immortalized on this website anywhere as I wasn't a member at the time (nor did I even realize 14ers.com was in existence), but I did a profoundly noobish thing on my first trip. The idea was sparked by a friend who climbed Longs peak when we were 16 year old sophomores back in The Flatness™ which is Illinois. After seeing their family photos and hearing her talk about it, I said, I'm going to climb that!" This is the same impulse which resulted in me doing the spelunking tour in Mammoth Cave.

It took a few years, but I eventually had a plan in place to make this happen. During the "extended" Labor Day break from college (by extended I mean a 4 day weekend), a few friends and I drove straight through to RMNP. We climbed the behemoth which is Deer Mountain the first day thinking that it would be going training for the following day, Longs. Heck, I didn't feel any difference in elevation (1 person in the group did); I was ready for it!

4 of us started Longs at 3am. Two of the group members were moving at a sluggish pace so we took frequent, and long, breaks. Getting passed by every single person on the trail that day struck a nerve, to say the least. About a mile before the boulderfield, the two members who were moving slowly and not feeling well decided to have my then-girlfriend (Kim) and I trudge on ahead. I told them I'd come back down after summiting to see if I could help them to the top, the idea of which is quite amusing in retrospect. Kim and I reached the boulderfield and then felt our pace begin to slow. Breathing became more laborious and our steps were smaller. After reaching the keyhole and hearing from a climber who was descending that it would be another 2 hours until the summit, I nearly blew a gasket; Kim nearly pushed me off the mountain. However, I was stubborn and so was she, so we continued.

The ledges were no big deal. The trough sucked!!! At the time I didn't realize it, but I had a 1.5 liter water bottle fall out of my backpack. This would come back to haunt me. We continued on through the Narrows getting slower with every step; we got passed by two 7-year-old girls as everyone else was coming down the mountain.. Such a blow to my previously enormous ego.

Despite the hardships (and sounding like we just completed wind-sprints), we made it to the summit. Sadly, there wasn't a transport helipad up there and we accepted that we had to get down. The RMNP rangers were on their way off when we arrived so we asked them to radio our ride in the campground to let her know we weren't going to be down at 2pm, as promised (it was already 11:30-noon). The ranger radioed that we'd be down by 4 or 5. I didn't think much of this at the time - no enough oxygen to think.

On the descent back to the Keyhole, I got REALLY dehydrated and felt like Sh*t). That missing water bottle would have been quite nice. Kim started to get worried about me since my stamina was so poor. Thankfully, we found water running through the boulders on the boulderfield and drank from it like we were goats - Filtering be damned! - and continued on our way. Oh! I nearly forgot this! On the descent back to the Keyhole, it started to rain lightly and the granite became a "character building" challenge (ie it sucked). In the boulderfield, Kim slipped on a rock (caught herself), but was so mentally drained that she started crying. We took a few minutes to recoup and continued to sluggishly make our way off this mountain.

While slow and steady may win the race, it was a PITA!!! We didn't arrive back to the TH until 8 or 8:30 (in the dark). Needless to say, our ride and two friends who turned around early, were expecting us at 5 at the latest was freaking out. She had called the cops to report us missing, although they would do anything until it had been 24 hours overdue. We got thoroughly chewed out by her and I think we may caused her more stress than that mountain caused for us. (Sorry, Jenny!)

Thus ended our 18 hour day of Logns Peak. While we got the sh*t beat out of us mentally and physically, we came away with a good story. Plus, I popped the question to Kim on the summit, so it was all worth it.

Image
(The ring wouldn't fit because her fingers had swelled so significantly)
Peter Aitchison on the risks of rock climbing and mountaineering: "That's life, isn't it? We think the challenge and satisfaction you get from doing this is worth the risks."

"Respect the mountain. Train hard. Hope you can sneak up when it isn't looking."

"The mind is always worried about consequences, but the heart knows no fear. The heart just does what it wants."

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Re: Memory Lane

Postby wildlobo71 » Fri Jun 22, 2012 11:26 am

Re: Attitude
by wildlobo71 » Wed Dec 17, 2008 2:48 pm

I am certainly not in the greatest shape; for me hiking is a process by which I say to myself "just do more and you'll lose it!" Gary, I will either count steps (make it to 50 then pause, or something) or I choose something on the trail, some flora, or a cairn, or the switchback that is ahead of me. If I just say my goal is "the top" I'd be tempted to turn around because it is still miles away.


I weighed almost 265 pounds at the time... I've seen a few of these posts from back then and feel a million miles away from that guy.

Nice post, Greg! We should all get as memorable moments.
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Re: Memory Lane

Postby tmathews » Fri Jun 22, 2012 11:32 am

wildlobo71 wrote:
Re: Attitude
by wildlobo71 » Wed Dec 17, 2008 2:48 pm

I am certainly not in the greatest shape; for me hiking is a process by which I say to myself "just do more and you'll lose it!" Gary, I will either count steps (make it to 50 then pause, or something) or I choose something on the trail, some flora, or a cairn, or the switchback that is ahead of me. If I just say my goal is "the top" I'd be tempted to turn around because it is still miles away.


I weighed almost 265 pounds at the time... I've seen a few of these posts from back then and feel a million miles away from that guy.

Nice post, Greg! We should all get as memorable moments.


This is your most memorable post for me, Bill. :lol: http://14ers.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=26318&start=12#p309752

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Re: Memory Lane

Postby wildlobo71 » Fri Jun 22, 2012 11:36 am

tmathews wrote:
wildlobo71 wrote:
Re: Attitude
by wildlobo71 » Wed Dec 17, 2008 2:48 pm

I am certainly not in the greatest shape; for me hiking is a process by which I say to myself "just do more and you'll lose it!" Gary, I will either count steps (make it to 50 then pause, or something) or I choose something on the trail, some flora, or a cairn, or the switchback that is ahead of me. If I just say my goal is "the top" I'd be tempted to turn around because it is still miles away.


I weighed almost 265 pounds at the time... I've seen a few of these posts from back then and feel a million miles away from that guy.

Nice post, Greg! We should all get as memorable moments.


This is your most memorable post for me, Bill. :lol: http://14ers.com/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=26318&start=12#p309752


Yes, I was thinking about resurrecting Karen Cairn... :lol:
My early days, before I knew what to contribute about hiking I hung out in Off-Route a lot... there were lots of crap threads, but some creative ones, too... I remember the "IT" thread, where "it" had to be part of the reply... Bill M. purged this thread along with hundreds of other Rustic and G classics... My favorite contribution in the IT Thread was "If you don't have it, you don't have sh..."
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Re: Memory Lane

Postby Doctor No » Fri Jun 22, 2012 11:47 am

This is pre-14ers.com for me, but in the summer of 2007, I took a bunch of coworkers up to the summit of Mount Bierstadt (ooooo.....)

We didn't leave Denver until 8am or so, and so of course, coming down we had hail and lightning. I can vividly recall at least one strike that seemed like it was about halfway between the trail and the Sawtooth, and everyone's hair was up on end (well, those of us who had hair).

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Re: Memory Lane

Postby Fisching » Fri Jun 22, 2012 12:15 pm

wildlobo71 wrote:
Re: Attitude
by wildlobo71 » Wed Dec 17, 2008 2:48 pm

I am certainly not in the greatest shape; for me hiking is a process by which I say to myself "just do more and you'll lose it!" Gary, I will either count steps (make it to 50 then pause, or something) or I choose something on the trail, some flora, or a cairn, or the switchback that is ahead of me. If I just say my goal is "the top" I'd be tempted to turn around because it is still miles away.


I weighed almost 265 pounds at the time... I've seen a few of these posts from back then and feel a million miles away from that guy.

Nice post, Greg! We should all get as memorable moments.


Thanks, Bill. Even my wildly insane ideas one in a while work out have a good ending. I came away from that experience learning that the majority of the "battle" with climbing a mountain is mental. Some of my hardest moments on a peak haven't been due to a physical problem, but overcoming my mindset.
~Greg
Peter Aitchison on the risks of rock climbing and mountaineering: "That's life, isn't it? We think the challenge and satisfaction you get from doing this is worth the risks."

"Respect the mountain. Train hard. Hope you can sneak up when it isn't looking."

"The mind is always worried about consequences, but the heart knows no fear. The heart just does what it wants."

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Re: Memory Lane

Postby DeucesWild » Fri Jun 22, 2012 1:14 pm

Here's one of my first postings :oops: :oops:

Deuce - Sept 25, 2011 wrote:
Bonehead wrote:
Deuce wrote:Allmond Bros


If you are going to make fun of your elders,
at least get the name of the band right.


My bad. Allman Bros.



I've since learned that they're a pretty decent band.


Deuce - October something 2011 wrote:
Any other MENSA members out there?
I just took one of those on-line tests, and low and behold, I scored in the top 2% in intelligence.

Just wondering if there were any other MENSA members among us? I'd love to do some 14ers this winter with some like-minded individuals.

Let me know!

Thanks.

Deuce



Since then, I've learned that normal brained people can occasionally have insightful comments.
Snowflakes, Uber Alles!

www.deuceIRA.com. Put the Douche in your FiDeuceiary needs today!!

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Re: Memory Lane

Postby sunny1 » Fri Jun 22, 2012 1:38 pm

DeucesWild wrote:
...Since then, I've learned that normal brained people can occasionally have insightful comments.


#-o :justkillme: :fight: (note the SHORT GUY always wins! :mrgreen: )

(the smilies help where words fail :wink:)
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