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WORD OF THE DAY - 14ers.com Series

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WORD OF THE DAY - 14ers.com Series

Postby wildlobo71 » Mon Feb 11, 2013 11:12 am

I have run across this time and again in trip reports, posts on various threads here and on other forums - a term that you've never heard before, or long forgotten about... like how Gray Jays, those birds that will land on your hand for the cracker in your fingers, are also called Camp Robber Jays or Whiskey Jacks? I am thinking about mountaineering, climbing, geographical, geological terms, etc... Let this thread be a location for people to explain what the hell they mean by the term "spindrift" (I thought I knew, but had to Wiki it to verify.)

For the inaugural entry - I give you the brilliant word "bjáfjallafílingur" - Icelandic, pronounced "bee-yahf-yall-a-fil-eengur". It roughly means the full-on blizzard conditions with zero visibility (a lot sexier than a "white-out".)

In sentence form: "Damn, we've got a real bjáfjallafílingur happening outside the gondola!" (I think the "damn" is essential to really emphasize the intensity of the situation.)
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Re: WORD OF THE DAY - 14ers.com Series

Postby jdorje » Mon Feb 11, 2013 12:16 pm

Bit of a bjáfjallafílingur going on here right now.
-Jason Dorje Short

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Re: WORD OF THE DAY - 14ers.com Series

Postby Oman » Mon Feb 11, 2013 12:41 pm

I shiver when I see krummholz poking through sastrugi.

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Re: WORD OF THE DAY - 14ers.com Series

Postby SummitKathy » Mon Feb 11, 2013 12:55 pm

I had never heard the word Graupel when I moved here. I experienced it very quickly after moving here and started climbing 14ers. I always called it "icy snowy stuff" until someone told me it was Graupel.

Graupel refers to precipitation that forms when supercooled droplets of water are collected and freeze on a falling snowflake, forming a 2–5 mm (0.079–0.197 in) ball of rime. Strictly speaking, graupel is not the same as hail or ice pellets, although it is sometimes referred to as small hail.
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Re: WORD OF THE DAY - 14ers.com Series

Postby Guitarzan » Mon Feb 11, 2013 1:10 pm

SummitKathy wrote:I had never heard the word Graupel when I moved here. I experienced it very quickly after moving here and started climbing 14ers. I always called it "icy snowy stuff" until someone told me it was Graupel.

Graupel refers to precipitation that forms when supercooled droplets of water are collected and freeze on a falling snowflake, forming a 2–5 mm (0.079–0.197 in) ball of rime. Strictly speaking, graupel is not the same as hail or ice pellets, although it is sometimes referred to as small hail.



Not to be confused with Grapple...........a deliscious apple that tastes like a grape. \:D/

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Re: WORD OF THE DAY - 14ers.com Series

Postby Oman » Mon Feb 11, 2013 1:25 pm

You don't get screaming barfies in a bar.

Re: WORD OF THE DAY - 14ers.com Series

Postby taylorzs » Mon Feb 11, 2013 1:30 pm

I was out hiking on Berthoud pass with my sister and (now)ex-girlfriend a few years ago and noticed surface hoar had recently formed down in Current Creek. I knelt down excitedly (yes, I am a snow nerd) talking half to myself and half to them about surface hoar. I was surprised to see surface hoar at the time and circumstance. I hear laughing and turn around to the two of them bent over laughing hysterically because they have no idea what I am talking about, all they can hear is me suddenly and excitedly talking about hoars(whores). ](*,)
-surface hoar- a type of faceted snow crystal, often the weak layer in an avalanche, that is formed during calm, clear nights when cold air sinks down into valleys (cold air displaces warm air because it is denser) and the water molecules in the air condense from gas to solid and form surface hoar, a type of snow crystal.
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Re: WORD OF THE DAY - 14ers.com Series

Postby planet54 » Mon Feb 11, 2013 1:50 pm

The Eskimos have 100 words for snow. :wink:
http://ontology.buffalo.edu/smith/varia/snow.html
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Re: WORD OF THE DAY - 14ers.com Series

Postby susanjoypaul » Mon Feb 11, 2013 3:13 pm

Snot-sicle: in winter, what happens when you neglect to properly wipe your nose.

Snenema: in winter, what happens when you squat too deeply into the snow. See also arse-sicle.

Schadenfreude (German), also skadefryd (Danish and Norwegian), skadeglädje (Swedish), vahingonilo (Finnish), and 'злорадство' (Russian and Bulgarian): in winter, how you feel when your hiking buddy gets a snot-sicle, snenema, or arse-sicle.

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Re: WORD OF THE DAY - 14ers.com Series

Postby Lemmiwinks » Mon Feb 11, 2013 4:02 pm

The most important word in my vocabulary: GNAR

gnar (adj,n): a shortened version of the word gnarly. Something that is really f***ing awesome or high on the coolness scale. Can be used back-to-back to emphasize the gnarliness of the feat.

ex.
That route on Sunlight Spire was totally gnar!!!1!
I can't wait to get out this weekend and take in the gnar gnar!
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Re: WORD OF THE DAY - 14ers.com Series

Postby its_not_a_tuba » Mon Feb 11, 2013 4:07 pm

Lemmiwinks wrote:The most important word in my vocabulary: GNAR

gnar (adj,n): a shortened version of the word gnarly. Something that is really f***ing awesome or high on the coolness scale. Can be used back-to-back to emphasize the gnarliness of the feat.

ex.
That route on Sunlight Spire was totally gnar!!!1!
I can't wait to get out this weekend and take in the gnar gnar!


AKA Gaffney's Numerical Assessment of Radness.
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Re: WORD OF THE DAY - 14ers.com Series

Postby SurfNTurf » Mon Feb 11, 2013 4:15 pm

Lemmiwinks wrote:The most important word in my vocabulary: GNAR

gnar (adj,n): a shortened version of the word gnarly. Something that is really f***ing awesome or high on the coolness scale. Can be used back-to-back to emphasize the gnarliness of the feat.

ex.
That route on Sunlight Spire was totally gnar!!!1!
I can't wait to get out this weekend and take in the gnar gnar!


At least in the surf world, where the slang originated, "gnarly" comes with heavy connotations of danger. It's less about something being rad and awesome, and more about it being dangerous and scary. Does that apply to the ski brah community as well, or is that part lost in translation? I'm legitimately asking. Not much of a skier.

Proper uses:

"This hurricane is bringing in some gnarly double-overhead waves, everyone but the ballsiest chargers are watching from the beach."

"That ice looks gnarly man, I wouldn't lead it."

"Let's stay on the ridge, that loaded slope is gnarly."
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"There have been joys too great to describe in words, and there have been griefs upon which I cannot dare to dwell; and with those in mind I say, 'Climb if you will, but remember that courage and strength are nought without prudence, and that a momentary negligence may destroy the happiness of a lifetime. Do nothing in haste, look well to each step, and from the beginning think what may be the end.'" - Edward Whymper

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