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Rainier Info pa pa pa please

14ers in California and Washington state or any other peak in the USA
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Re: Rainer Info pa pa pa please

Postby MuchosPixels » Mon Jan 28, 2013 8:18 am

seth0687 wrote:Thanks CO Native.

For those who have been up Rainier in early July, what did you use for your bottom layers? I always run Cap2 under my softshell pants for ice climbing, but was contemplating getting a silk weight set to run under Cap3 under the softshell pants since it may be colder?!?

Thanks again for being an awesome sounding board for all my questions.

Seth


Hi, Its not like you are going to be hanging around on the upper mountain doing nothing for hours. You will be doing lot's of work and most likely will hike with a baselayer top as your top layer and a shell, maybe. Its good to have a nice puffy (hooded, dont skimp on this layer, its better to have more than required) to retain heat during stops and for when on the summit. Regarding lower layers Cap 2 should be enough and the soft-shell pants. I might be tempted to bring some very lightweight full zip shell pants just in case also in addition to the softshell pants.

Lot's of good advice on this thread. Its really best to not have a heavy pack. There is really no need for a 2 man team to have packs more than 40 lbs. each. 60lb is just insane unless you are staying there for a week or more.
Last edited by MuchosPixels on Mon Jan 28, 2013 8:22 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Rainer Info pa pa pa please

Postby shearmodulus » Mon Jan 28, 2013 8:19 am

I'm going to the Denali Preparation Course on Mount Rainier from 23 February to 3 March through Alpine Ascents International.

I'll post a detailed report when I return. Obviously, conditions in the spring/summer will be drastically different, but I'll share whatever I learn.

I appreciate the pack pointers for flying, having never flown with my mountaineering stuff before. Fortunately I have a ginormous zippered duffle to take with me as well.

Good to know that my prep technique (suffering over long climbs with a heavy pack) is the recommended technique.

Getting excited. :-)
"Roads? Where we're going, we don't need roads...."

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Re: Rainer Info pa pa pa please

Postby seth0687 » Mon Jan 28, 2013 8:31 am

shearmodulus wrote:I'm going to the Denali Preparation Course on Mount Rainier from 23 February to 3 March through Alpine Ascents International.

I'll post a detailed report when I return. Obviously, conditions in the spring/summer will be drastically different, but I'll share whatever I learn.

I appreciate the pack pointers for flying, having never flown with my mountaineering stuff before. Fortunately I have a ginormous zippered duffle to take with me as well.

Good to know that my prep technique (suffering over long climbs with a heavy pack) is the recommended technique.

Getting excited. :-)


Sounds awesome!! Are you shooting for Denali next year? Good luck and I look forward to the trip report!

MuchosPixels wrote:
seth0687 wrote:Thanks CO Native.

For those who have been up Rainier in early July, what did you use for your bottom layers? I always run Cap2 under my softshell pants for ice climbing, but was contemplating getting a silk weight set to run under Cap3 under the softshell pants since it may be colder?!?

Thanks again for being an awesome sounding board for all my questions.

Seth


Hi, Its not like you are going to be hanging around on the upper mountain doing nothing for hours. You will be doing lot's of work and most likely will hike with a baselayer top as your top layer and a shell, maybe. Its good to have a nice puffy (hooded, dont skimp on this layer, its better to have more than required) to retain heat during stops and for when on the summit. Regarding lower layers Cap 2 should be enough and the soft-shell pants. I might be tempted to bring some very lightweight full zip shell pants just in case also in addition to the softshell pants.

Lot's of good advice on this thread. Its really best to not have a heavy pack. There is really no need for a 2 man team to have packs more than 40 lbs. each. 60lb is just insane unless you are staying there for a week or more.


Sounds good, I'm shooting for a pack weight between 35-40lbs in a 50L pack. Thanks again for the advice, makes sense that less is more for warmth given the amount of physical exertion.

Seth

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Re: Rainer Info pa pa pa please

Postby rjennings » Mon Jan 28, 2013 2:00 pm

I would disagree with the baselayer comment saying the only thing needed is a thick baselayer and hard shell...last summer we were there over 4th of July and on our alpine start, temp was between 0 to 8 degrees with 35 mph winds and 50 mph gusts (that weather isn't common for that time of year, but you should at least be prepared for it). I would have been mighty cold with just a baselayer and a hardshell.
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Re: Rainer Info pa pa pa please

Postby zdero1 » Tue Jan 29, 2013 12:27 am

I agree with RJ here...best to play it conservative. I climbed it 6/22/10 and brought a baselayer, fleece, softshell, and parka. I was thankful to have the parka for rest breaks on summit day, but only wore the baselayer during the actually climbing.

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Re: Rainer Info pa pa pa please

Postby pvnisher » Tue Jan 29, 2013 2:04 am

If you go up with just a hardshell and a baselayer you'd better have a great weather forecast and a solid belief in its accuracy.

For those who post, "I wore this... it's all you'll need!", keep in mind that's like saying "I hiked a 14er once and it wasn't windy at all. You won't have wind, either."

There's a reason that it's the most heavily glaciated peak in the lower 48. And it's not because it's warm. ](*,)

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Re: Rainer Info pa pa pa please

Postby seth0687 » Tue Jan 29, 2013 5:10 am

pvnisher wrote:If you go up with just a hardshell and a baselayer you'd better have a great weather forecast and a solid belief in its accuracy.

For those who post, "I wore this... it's all you'll need!", keep in mind that's like saying "I hiked a 14er once and it wasn't windy at all. You won't have wind, either."

There's a reason that it's the most heavily glaciated peak in the lower 48. And it's not because it's warm. ](*,)


I couldn't agree more. I have my top layering system down pat, but just want to make sure my legs are warm. I'm thinking Patagonia Cap1 under Cap 3 under softshell pants should be more than enough (with shell pants in the pack). I really don't want to lug up fleece/down pants if I don't have to and most of the guide companies say they aren't necessary.

Thanks,

Seth

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Re: Rainer Info pa pa pa please

Postby pvnisher » Tue Jan 29, 2013 7:35 am

seth0687 wrote:I'm thinking Patagonia Cap1 under Cap 3 under softshell pants should be more than enough (with shell pants in the pack).


I would bring both your 1 and 3 to your hotel, but only take one set up the hill, based on the forecast when you start walking. You wouldn't want all 4 layers on unless the fx was to be exceptionally frigid.

My guess is that you'll probably just wear the Cap1 with your climbing pants, but that, of course, can vary!

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Re: Rainer Info pa pa pa please

Postby Carl » Tue Jan 29, 2013 12:48 pm

pvnisher wrote:
seth0687 wrote:I'm thinking Patagonia Cap1 under Cap 3 under softshell pants should be more than enough (with shell pants in the pack).


I would bring both your 1 and 3 to your hotel, but only take one set up the hill, based on the forecast when you start walking. You wouldn't want all 4 layers on unless the fx was to be exceptionally frigid.


Agreed. I'd also bring a lightweight pair of shorts in case you get to the TH and want to hike the approach in them.

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Re: Rainer Info pa pa pa please

Postby MtnClimber82 » Tue Jan 29, 2013 2:39 pm

I was up over 4th of July also. I am a pretty warm blooded person and wore a 165g/m2 wool baselayer, 230g/m2 wool mid layer and my softshells for summit day. I have huge vent zips on my legs so I was able to dump heat when we were moving in the afternoon but the wind was so strong I kept them closed most of the day and was quite comfortable. I find it easier to regulate my temperature up top with different layers so I do dress a little heavy on my legs since I can't change that as easy...

Like others have said, get out on peaks in 30° weather with winds and climb to see what YOU need. I would rather err on the side of warmth, as I mentioned before, we did have a member who had to wait on an exposed slope in high wind for another rope team to return since he had become temporarily blind. As a medical provider, I was mostly worried that he'd become hypothermic. Remember, bad things usually don't, but can happen.

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Re: Rainer Info pa pa pa please

Postby climbing_rob » Tue Jan 29, 2013 2:47 pm

I've experienced anything from Baking Hot to Frigid Cold in the 5 times I've climbed Rainier via. the emmons route, each and every time in early/mid July. Last year was a prime example; stellar forecast, the actual weather was probably the coldest summit I've ever had the pleasure of (very) briefly visiting.

Don't take this mountain lightly with respect to adequate attire. And you might want to read Roachs' Das Cave account. Yikes! that all being said, Rainier might be my favorite all time mountain, at least in the top 3. enjoy and be safe! And well equipped. Sure, you can try it less well equipped, and good chance you'll have the luck of some who have posted answers here and be fine. I like my 100% success rate. That would not have been possible w/o a full "rack" of the right clothing.

Here is mine, bottom up: sock liners, exped wool socks, lightweight long johns, soft shell (shoeller) mountaineering pants, hard shell over-pants, base layer top, microfleece 2nd layer, medium weight down jacket (MHW phantom), bomber hard shell jacket, double plastic boots. glove liners, 2nd layer shoeller gloves, bomber ski-type over gloves. Balaclava and goggles. Total kit is still fairly lightweight, and very versatile.

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Re: Rainer Info pa pa pa please

Postby climbing_rob » Tue Jan 29, 2013 2:53 pm

MtnClimber82 wrote: as I mentioned before, we did have a member who had to wait on an exposed slope in high wind for another rope team to return since he had become temporarily blind. As a medical provider, I was mostly worried that he'd become hypothermic. Remember, bad things usually don't, but can happen.
And it was my wife sat with this infirmed gentleman while the rest of the rope team summited and returned, cold and windy, for about an hour. This would not have been either safe or possible w/o a really bomber kit of clothing. the entire team would have had to bail and not summit. Be versatile on Rainier.

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