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California 14er Guidebook

14ers in California and Washington state or any other peak in the USA
Posts: 99
Joined: Fri Mar 14, 2008 6:14 am
Location: Littleton

Re: California 14er Guidebook

Postby Randonnee » Thu Apr 24, 2008 12:32 pm

I moved here from CA last summer the accepted number I have seen is 15. There are 2 additional peaks Keeler Needle and Crook's Peak that are so close to Whitney and Muir that they are considered sub-peaks.

California also has 2 of those 14's that are not in the Sierra. White Mtn. is in the White Mountain Range, and Shasta which is in the Cascade range.

I have used the Burns' guide and found it helpful. Secor includes hundreds of peaks and is great for any trip into the Sierra. Most of the people I know who live in the area have both in their libraries.


Just a side note for those who discount the number of 14's in CA., remember that Whitney is the tallest peak in the Lower 48. It has something to offer most climbers, difficulty ranges from a class 1 trail to 5.8 routes on the east face.
"When the government fears the people, you have liberty. When the people fear the government, you have tyranny."

(Thomas Jefferson)

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Posts: 83
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2007 12:45 pm
Location: Thousand Oaks, CA

Re: California 14er Guidebook

Postby rider » Thu Apr 24, 2008 12:40 pm

What California lacks in quantity it makes up for in quality, elevation gain, and technical difficulty.


Agree!! Each CA 14er achieved is a big prize since their long and arduous trips. BJ --- you should make a point to climb Split. Of the CA 14ers, I've climbed Whitney, Langley, and Split ... and Split is still my favorite CA or CO 14er. I'm wanting to go back to Split and use the 2nd toughest route which comes from the south side of the split and traverse the gap to the higher northern side. The split in the mountain is really spectacular, since it's a wide and deep gap with very nearly equal north and south peaks. ... I'm hoping to get Tyndall this year, but I don't know about even trying Williamson due to the chimney. The views at Red Lake are really, really nice also.

Good luck on the Williamson climb. From what I've read of trip reports on the internet, that route can be an adventure due to the trail conditions and snow levels.

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Posts: 185
Joined: Tue Aug 21, 2007 12:09 pm
Location: Orange County, California

Re: California 14er Guidebook

Postby bj » Thu Apr 24, 2008 1:54 pm

rider wrote:
you should make a point to climb Split.


It's already penciled in for July. I'm surprised you liked it so much. Everything I've heard says it's the least enjoyable 14'er climb in California.
Just a drinker with a climbing problem..

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Posts: 83
Joined: Tue Mar 20, 2007 12:45 pm
Location: Thousand Oaks, CA

Re: California 14er Guidebook

Postby rider » Thu Apr 24, 2008 11:03 pm

rider wrote:

you should make a point to climb Split.



It's already penciled in for July. I'm surprised you liked it so much. Everything I've heard says it's the least enjoyable 14'er climb in California.


That's funny, I hadn't heard that. To each, their own ... I guess.

My best ever mountain photo is of Split. It's a photo that shows what climbing 6000 feet is all about, but the photo was taken far from the mountain on my first attempt when I was way off course. After that trip, I had to wait a whole year to plan another trip and get back out there. (be careful of any maps showing the trail to be on the south side of the creek, it's on the north side and never crosses to the south side).

The approach to Split does feature some slippery gravel slopes which are tough with a big pack on your back ... I spent some time on the ground and in the dust trying to claw my way up in spots.

jhodlof

Re: California 14er Guidebook

Postby jhodlof » Fri Apr 25, 2008 1:33 pm

Try to post a trip report for Williamson. That looks like a great mountain. I might try to do it, someday.

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Joined: Thu May 29, 2008 4:38 pm
Location: Shasta Lake, CA

Re: California 14er Guidebook

Postby Shasta Locales » Mon Jun 02, 2008 11:36 am

Unfortunately, there really isn't a good guidebook out there for climbing the California 14'ers. (there are 15 - Washington has just 1, Rainier - and all the rest in the lower 48 are in Colorado)
The one mentioned in the above posts, by Porcella and Burns, is the only one sold, and I've found its really not very useful. Another bad thing, there aren't any websites as excellent as this one is for Colorado - for California. I've often wondered with all the IT nuts here, why none have ever tried to anything better than what is available, but I guess they don't leave the front of their computer screens much. :lol:
The best sites for info on Cal 14ers are the Whitney Portal Store website - they specifically talk alot about Whitney, but if you have a question regarding the other Sierra 14ers (Shasta excepted) you will always find someone knowledgable who can answer your question on there. http://www.whitneyportalstore.com/
Summitpost is also useful for California peaks, and a better source for route descriptions than the above mentioned book.http://www.summitpost.org/
Mt Shasta is a little different. It is a Cascade volcano, and therefore climbed differently than the Sierra peaks. A good website for info on Shasta is http://www.climbingmtshasta.org/ , although it does not have a "Forum" to use.

As a Californian who also loves visiting Colorado, I'd offer my opinion on the differences. First off, the reason we love to visit Colorado and climb there, the accessablility of the peaks is much better in Colorado. The majority of California peaks cannot be done in a day-hike, they are a little bit more of a wilderness experience. Also, very few can be done in "combination" like some Colorado peaks can be done.
The peaks are not located near heavily populated areas, either. Living in Northern California, we are lucky to be just an hour from Mt Shasta. But if we want to do a peak in the Sierra's, it's about a 10 hour drive from here. When we lived in the SF Bay area, it was still about an 8 hour drive away. The Sierra peaks are far from LA too - Whitney alone is about a 4 hour drive just from Bakersfield. So it makes bagging a peak much more of time committment than in Colorado.
While some peaks are comparable in difficulty to Colorado peaks, many require more technical rock climbing knowledge. Mt Shasta, being a Cascade volcano, not only requires that you have an ice axe and crampons, but that you are very familiar with how to use your ice axe and crampons, even on the standard Avalanche gulch route.

Love the California 14ers and love the Colorado 14ers. But climbing them is very different.

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