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Re: tents

Postby mtnview » Sat Dec 08, 2012 6:19 pm

MSR Hubba Hubba 2 person, adequate 3 season tent if you pick the right camp spot.
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Re: tents

Postby RoanMtnMan » Sat Dec 08, 2012 6:57 pm

Black Diamond Firstlight or Highlight. Best all around tents for most everything in CO. I used to carry just a bivy, but 4 years ago I got one of these and I decided to put the bivy away. 3lbs, packs to a size slightly larger than a softball, and I can fit my 6'3" and my wife's 5'10" bum in there. It's a little tight, but it works for us. I am a big fan of the single wall design.
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Re: tents

Postby B[3] » Sat Dec 08, 2012 8:29 pm

Have to second the recommendation for the MSR Hubba Hubba (2 person). We bought one of these prior to our 180 mile backpacking loop last summer in the Weminuche (to replace an old REI tent that had had it) and it was great! We encountered interesting weather conditions during the monsoon while camping above 12,000 ft, and the tent withstood it all.

Since then, I've used it by myself, and I find it quite nice as a one person tent. It's very roomy, and I can comfortably fit myself, dog (>50 lbs) and gear inside. Although it's a 3 season tent, I stayed warm while camping in early November when temps dropped to 19 degrees F overnight.

We bought our tent from Neptune Mountaineering, but you can also buy the tent from REI.

http://www.neptunemountaineering.com/Tents-and-Shelters/3671/dept

*Note: looks like the Hubba (1 person) is on sale ($175) at Neptune's, but when I clicked on the link it was out of stock*
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Re: tents

Postby winmag4582001 » Sat Dec 08, 2012 9:14 pm

I think they should change the name from "4 season" to "4th season". IMO
I bought a http://www.mountainhardwear.com/LightPath%E2%84%A2-3/OU9607,default,pd.html. It's light(6lbs w/ footprint) and can handle wind, but takes up some space in the pack. Also, it's not free standing. It's the best three season tent I've personally owned. There's more than plenty of room for two adult size people and a 10yr old that sleeps like a starfish!
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Re: tents

Postby yourhorsedoctor » Sat Dec 08, 2012 11:18 pm

+1 on the Mountain Hardwear Lightpath. I have the 2 person variety and love it! It does take up a bit of room, but is extremely easy to set up and has more than enough room for 2 people and all the gear.

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Re: tents

Postby ezabielski » Sat Dec 08, 2012 11:35 pm

A 1 person tent would be probably be too small if you're looking to keep all that stuff directly inside the tent, but a backpack doesn't have to be inside the tent, most tents have vestibules for that. A four season tent won't be necessary in almost any condition you face in Sping-Summer-Fall unless you are doing something special. The greatest strengths of a four season tent are immense strength against wind, and protection from extreme weather (not most afternoon showers in Colorado). In any case, you will have a difficult time finding a 4 season tent that is light enough. BD makes a 2lbs 13oz one that is the lightest 4 season I know of, the Firstlight (2 person). The problem is that it's single walled and condensation would become a major problem in a lot of environments. Hilleberg makes some light 4 season tents, like the Jannu (2 person) which is a bit over 6 pounds for a double walled, absolute bomb proof, 4 season.

As for lightweight 3 season tents, I am intrigued by the Big Agnes Fly Creek UL2, a double walled tent weighing 2 lbs 10 oz.

You can get a lot of tents that have been suggested at REI, which has a super good return policy if anything ever goes wrong with the tent.

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Re: tents

Postby Gabriel » Sun Dec 09, 2012 5:09 am

I like my BD Firstlight. It will handle any CO conditions and has also worked well on high altitude trips. Being a single wall it's not ideal in humid conditions.

For your stated needs look into the Tera Nova Ultra Laser 1. At 1lb/ 1oz it's the lightest 3 season tent available. If I ever give up high alt climbing it's what I'm going to buy.

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Re: tents

Postby nyker » Sun Dec 09, 2012 8:39 am

The single walls like BD or the new MH Direkt are very light which are great to throw in the pack and pretty easy to set up once you get used to the internal pole setup, and great for higher altitudes where chance for snow is higher than rain and also can be setup with a smaller footprint. I've known people to bend/snap poles in these when not careful. They could be prone to condensation and are usually not seam sealed from the factory. Since you seem to planning to use this during times of year when rain would be frequent, this might be an issue if some leakage bothers you.

Check out Hilleberg tents: For one person, the soulo would work well and has a built in vestuibule for gear storage and is a double wall that pitches together in one step. This is a pretty bomber tent. Not that lightest tent, but you won't have to worry about the weather/wind too much with this one.

http://www.hilleberg.com/home/products/soulo/soulo.php

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Re: tents

Postby Dave B » Sun Dec 09, 2012 8:40 am

RoanMtnMan wrote:...and my wife's 5'10" bum in there...


Boy, could that be taken the wrong way.

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Re: tents

Postby Tim A » Sun Dec 09, 2012 8:57 am

I too am shopping for a tent for camping in the high country from June-August in CO, and have been recommended the REI Quarter-Dome T2 by multiple personalities in the REI store, yet I don't see it recommended here. Anyone have any bad experience with one up high?

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Re: tents

Postby nyker » Sun Dec 09, 2012 8:59 am

Re: on the Terra Nova Tents (U.K. company) -

Terra Nova (The old Wild Country brand) makes excellent heavy duty mountaineering tents (similar style as Hilleberg) and other gear - but they also make some super lightweight tents for ultrarace /adventure racing, so when looking at them, make sure you get the right one for your application. There is a trade-off here regarding weight/durability.

They have a line of models that are lighter than any other tent out there. I was looking into these and when I had the opportunity to be in the UK this summer and looked at a few of them, particularly the laser and solar series. The guys in the store actually talked me out of them since they didn't think they were very durable and would likely rip apart in a good storm. One guy said he put his foot through the wall when stretching one night since the walls on the ultralights are very thin and almost see-through. Keep in mind I never used one, so this is only the words of the three guys in the Cotsworld store in London, though they seemed to have a good knowledge base of tents. I think Terra Nova also have a lifetime guarantee on them, though.

I'd love to get a hold of some of their gear and test it out, though they are pretty pricy! The Voyager is a 2p ultralight model and sells for 1,100 STG (thats over $1,700)
The Ultra Laser looks cool too! Note it is about $1,100. http://www.terra-nova.co.uk/tents-and-spares/all-tents/laser-ultra-1-tent/

http://www.terra-nova.co.uk/tents-and-spares/ultralight-lightweight-tents/

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Re: tents

Postby B[3] » Sun Dec 09, 2012 9:25 am

TheodenKing1 wrote:I too am shopping for a tent for camping in the high country from June-August in CO, and have been recommended the REI Quarter-Dome T2 by multiple personalities in the REI store, yet I don't see it recommended here. Anyone have any bad experience with one up high?


Have you tried to pitch one of these? When we were shopping for a tent last June, we pitched a lot of tents in REI. They suggested this tent and said they would be back to check on us. Well, about a half hour later we finally got the tent up and that's when the REI salesperson showed back up.

Besides the issues with pitching it, the design just didn't seem like it would be as stable as some of the other tents. That being said, I saw at least one party using one of these tents on the Colorado Trail last summer.
Learn from the mistakes of others--you can never live long enough to make them all yourself.--Unknown
Don't chase your dreams, catch them.--Unknown

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