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What it's like to freeze to death

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Re: What it's like to freeze to death

Postby dsunwall » Mon Feb 04, 2013 1:02 pm

fascinating!

although off the main track of this article, this leads back to the "walking around with snowballs in your hand threads" from way back. Were you a Norwegian fisherman or Inuit hunter, both of whom frequently work gloveless in the cold, your chilled hands would open their surface capillaries periodically to allow surges of warm blood to pass into them and maintain their flexibility. This phenomenon, known as the hunter's response, can elevate a 35-degree skin temperature to 50 degrees within seven or eight minutes.

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Re: What it's like to freeze to death

Postby TheOtherIndian » Mon Feb 04, 2013 4:45 pm

Chilling narrative. More haunting is the shift of perspective from first person to third person and back to first person.
"There's only one thing I hate more than lying. Skim milk. Which is water that's lying about being milk" -Swanson, Ron

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Re: What it's like to freeze to death

Postby Fisching » Mon Feb 04, 2013 6:30 pm

TheOtherIndian wrote:Chilling narrative. More haunting is the shift of perspective from first person to third person and back to first person.


This is the English teacher speaking in me, but the perspective change goes to second person point of view (not third), which is quite extraordinary. Second person is rarely used in any form of literature and even harder to find it done successfully as it is with this article. Chilling narrative indeed.

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Peter Aitchison on the risks of rock climbing and mountaineering: "That's life, isn't it? We think the challenge and satisfaction you get from doing this is worth the risks."

"Respect the mountain. Train hard. Hope you can sneak up when it isn't looking."

"The mind is always worried about consequences, but the heart knows no fear. The heart just does what it wants."

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Re: What it's like to freeze to death

Postby RoanMtnMan » Mon Feb 04, 2013 7:16 pm

Good article. Thanks for sharing. It reminded me of an article I read about Guy Waterman (Johnny Waterman's father), climbing Mt Lafayette, VT in winter to basically commit suicide via weather exposure back in 2000 (I think it was Outside magazine). It seems like a really bad way to go to me.
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Re: What it's like to freeze to death

Postby Iguru » Mon Feb 04, 2013 9:22 pm

This subject gave me a chill, no really. What a thought.
I think once you get past the point of thinking straight, the horribleness of it is over.
Fade to black.
I am sure there are ALOT worse ways to go.
I gotta get me an Avatar.

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Re: What it's like to freeze to death

Postby wooderson » Mon Feb 04, 2013 10:09 pm

RoanMtnMan wrote:Good article. Thanks for sharing. It reminded me of an article I read about Guy Waterman (Johnny Waterman's father), climbing Mt Lafayette, VT in winter to basically commit suicide via weather exposure back in 2000 (I think it was Outside magazine). It seems like a really bad way to go to me.


I think this is the article you're referring to: http://www.outsideonline.com/outdoor-adventure/A-Natural-Death.html

National Geographic Adventure published another article called "The Last Cairn" back in 2003. Can't seem to find a link to the full piece, but it was adapted from Chip Brown's bio of Guy Waterman, Good Morning Midnight (great book!):

http://www.amazon.com/Good-Morning-Midnight-Life-Death/dp/1573222364

The article the OP linked to is fascinating, too... I actually stumbled on it several weeks ago, via longform.org, right at the start of winter. Kinda gave me the yips about going out in the cold!

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Re: What it's like to freeze to death

Postby Hungry Jack » Tue Feb 05, 2013 3:23 am

Interesting read and vaguely familiar. Has this been published before?

I hate to obsess, but the article makes me think of those hikers in Missouri and how those two children and their dad died so needlessly from exposure. I cannot shake the thought of those two kids suffering in the cold.
:(

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Re: What it's like to freeze to death

Postby Jim Davies » Tue Feb 05, 2013 10:53 am

It was a chapter in this book: Last Breath by Peter Stark.

The book is a collection of stories like this one, about different ways to kill yourself in the outdoors (falling, scurvy, altitude sickness, drowning, insect bites, etc.). Good stuff.
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Re: What it's like to freeze to death

Postby TheOtherIndian » Tue Feb 05, 2013 11:59 am

Fisching wrote:This is the English teacher speaking in me, but the perspective change goes to second person point of view (not third), which is quite extraordinary. Second person is rarely used in any form of literature and even harder to find it done successfully as it is with this article. Chilling narrative indeed.


Thanks for the correction. I did a little more reading (wiki of course) and it seems this is a shift from second to third and back to second person view. Do you agree? Nevertheless my original statement was wrong.

Jim Davies wrote:It was a chapter in this book: Last Breath by Peter Stark.

The book is a collection of stories like this one, about different ways to kill yourself in the outdoors (falling, scurvy, altitude sickness, drowning, insect bites, etc.). Good stuff.


The book seems interesting. Is it good? The amazon reviews didnt help much. What is your personal opinion?
"There's only one thing I hate more than lying. Skim milk. Which is water that's lying about being milk" -Swanson, Ron

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Re: What it's like to freeze to death

Postby Fisching » Tue Feb 05, 2013 2:30 pm

TheOtherIndian wrote: Thanks for the correction. I did a little more reading (wiki of course) and it seems this is a shift from second to third and back to second person view. Do you agree? Nevertheless my original statement was wrong.

Jim Davies wrote:It was a chapter in this book: Last Breath by Peter Stark.

The book is a collection of stories like this one, about different ways to kill yourself in the outdoors (falling, scurvy, altitude sickness, drowning, insect bites, etc.). Good stuff.


The book seems interesting. Is it good? The amazon reviews didnt help much. What is your personal opinion?


That POV analysis appears to be correct to me. If you're into books like the one Jim mentioned, my wife thoroughly enjoyed reading "Death in Yosemite."
http://www.amazon.com/Off-Wall-Yosemite-Michael-Ghiglieri/dp/0970097360
Peter Aitchison on the risks of rock climbing and mountaineering: "That's life, isn't it? We think the challenge and satisfaction you get from doing this is worth the risks."

"Respect the mountain. Train hard. Hope you can sneak up when it isn't looking."

"The mind is always worried about consequences, but the heart knows no fear. The heart just does what it wants."

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Re: What it's like to freeze to death

Postby wooderson » Tue Feb 05, 2013 5:28 pm

Fisching wrote:If you're into books like the one Jim mentioned, my wife thoroughly enjoyed reading "Death in Yosemite."
http://www.amazon.com/Off-Wall-Yosemite-Michael-Ghiglieri/dp/0970097360


There's also a Death In Yellowstone, which I read a while back. Good read. The section on death by hot springs is nightmarish stuff...

http://www.amazon.com/Death-Yellowstone-Accidents-Foolhardiness-National/dp/1570980217/ref=pd_bxgy_b_img_y/183-4562613-2726843

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