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What are you reading?

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby TomM » Sun Jan 13, 2013 6:01 pm

Recently read:

Across the Savage Sea - Maud Fontenoy
A Walk on the Wild Side - Nelson Algren
Black Beard America's Most Notorious Pirate - Angus Konstam
Basic Economics - Thomas Sowell

Currently reading:

Mao The Unknown Story - Jung Chang/Jon Halliday

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby Flips » Sat Jan 19, 2013 12:07 am

The Unthinkable: Who Survives When Disaster Strikes - and Why - by Amanda Ripley

Was in the middle of this book last summer as the Waldo Canyon fire started. I observed many behaviors described in this book not only in myself but in people all around me.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby Scuba Steve » Thu Jan 24, 2013 6:31 pm

Anyone read Four against the Arctic by David Roberts?

Any good?

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby Jesse M » Thu Jan 24, 2013 9:46 pm

The Music Lesson-A Spiritual Search For Growth Through Music
by Victor Wooten.

This is a great book for any musicians out there, music lovers, or anyone who might want to get to know who music is.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby Jim Davies » Fri Jan 25, 2013 4:56 pm

Scuba Steve wrote:Anyone read Four against the Arctic by David Roberts?

Any good?

Yes, and yes. :) It's both an incredible survival story, and a great detective job by Roberts to figure out what happened.

I saw a new book by Roberts just yesterday: Alone on the Ice: The Greatest Survival Story in the History of Exploration, the story of Douglas Mawson surviving three weeks out alone in Antarctica in 1913. Looks like it has potential.
Some people are afraid of heights. Not me, I'm afraid of white blood cells.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby TomM » Fri Jan 25, 2013 6:18 pm

The Ordeal by Ice books by Farley Mowat are good reads if you are into early exploration.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby Flips » Sun Feb 03, 2013 9:31 pm

Jim Davies wrote:"The Signal and the Noise" by Nate Silver. Fascinating discussion of forecasting and prediction in various areas (weather, economics, elections, epidemics, sports). Not to spoil the plot, but it reinforced my impressions of weather forecasts (short-term forecasts have improved markedly in recent years, but anything over 8 days is worse than taking the averages for the date!). Also, economists are really, really bad at predicting the future, but usually don't care because of political bias.


+1 Thanks Jim. Based on your summary, I read this book. Excellent.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby JE242 » Thu Feb 07, 2013 3:15 pm

Concrete, Bulletproof, Invisible and fried: My Life as a Revolting Cock -The autobiography of Chris Connelly. (RevCo, Ministry, Pigface)

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby Jim Davies » Fri Feb 08, 2013 9:08 am

I'm currently working my way through Fred Beckey's 100 Favorite North American Climbs, which I won in a contest from gb's blog (sponsored by Patagonia - thanks, Frank!). This is a massive, impressive, coffee-table book; be sure to warm up before trying to lift it. The preface is a climbing bio of Beckey, who must be the greatest American climber ever, starting with a 47-day expedition to do the second ascent of Mount Waddington at age 18, accompanied by his 16-year-old brother! I haven't read many of the individual route descriptions, but they're generally well-illustrated and have interesting stories. It will probably take me years to skim my way through the individual route descriptions, but it'll be fun (I'm unlikely to ever climb any of them). Available as an e-book if you don't have the storage space. :)

One interesting feature is the detailed route descriptions and guidebook-like access and caveats on each climb. I'm trying to imagine anyone carrying this book on a climb, and failing.
Some people are afraid of heights. Not me, I'm afraid of white blood cells.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby DaveLanders » Fri Feb 08, 2013 4:30 pm

I just finished "Surviving Survival" by Laurence Gonzales (author of "Deep Survival").
This one is about how people deal with the aftermath of traumatic experiences.
If you liked "Deep Survival", you might enjoy "Surviving Survival".

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby susanjoypaul » Tue Feb 12, 2013 8:07 am

Right now I'm reading a whole bunch of books as reference material for a book that I'm writing, so no reading "for fun" :(

But my favorite adventure book is "Endurance" by Alfred Lansing, which chronicles Ernest Shackleton's 1914 attempt to cross Antarctica. So I was very interested in reading about the recent reenactment of his crew's voyage/climb/near-disaster by a British-Australian team. There are a bunch of stories about it online, including This One. There's a documentary about the original journey posted at the bottom of the page. It looks like the one I have on DVD, which is very good.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby kansas » Tue Feb 12, 2013 11:41 am

susanjoypaul wrote:But my favorite adventure book is "Endurance" by Alfred Lansing, which chronicles Ernest Shackleton's 1914 attempt to cross Antarctica.


At Fletch's insistence, I just finished this one.

I'd have to say it's near the top of my list, if not the top. Never again will I feel like I have the right to complain or whine about much of anything.
"In the end, of course, it changed almost nothing. But I came to appreciate that mountains make poor receptacles for dreams."
— Jon Krakauer

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