What's the best type of training?

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ezabielski
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Re: What's the best type of training?

Post by ezabielski » Mon Jan 11, 2021 8:17 pm

For 14ers, TFTNA is simply not the target activity, so I am surprised it is being much discussed here. Walking up 14ers, maybe doing a bit of scrambling, usually in a day trip, is not alpinism. Their other book, Training for the Uphill Athlete, addresses the more general case, mostly geared towards trail/mountain running.

Me? I find running up Green Mountain a few hundred times is good training. Or walking across the country. Between those two things you're pretty much set to walk uphill.
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Re: What's the best type of training?

Post by sigepnader » Mon Jan 11, 2021 8:27 pm

CrossFit three days a week, weight training three days a week - a lot of lunges, squats, deadlifts, planks, and I’ll ride my spin bike thirty minutes every night before bed.

And if you’re old..stretch.
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Re: What's the best type of training?

Post by Marmot72 » Mon Jan 11, 2021 8:42 pm

All I will add is variety. Over sustained years, variety is helpful, to avoid developing muscular imbalances, which becomes much more important as one ages. I primarily alternate jogging and cycling, and various weight-lifting routines.

I'm a terrible swimmer, but I've always thought swimming would be an excellent activity, because of the combination of exertion and holding breath. Lemke was a collegiate swimmer, if I recall, and I'd say he's none too shabby in the hills. My sole time hiking with him, in spring snow, was the day after he had done a multi-peak outing and only slept maybe 4 hours afterward.

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Re: What's the best type of training?

Post by pbakwin » Mon Jan 11, 2021 8:47 pm

The best training is to do what you enjoy, so that you will do it consistently and, you know, enjoy doing it.
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Re: What's the best type of training?

Post by Jorts » Tue Jan 12, 2021 8:07 am

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Re: What's the best type of training?

Post by CaptCO » Tue Jan 12, 2021 8:53 am

Jorts wrote:
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Re: What's the best type of training?

Post by Bill G » Tue Jan 12, 2021 10:01 am

The best training is Little Chocolate Donuts.
https://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-live ... nuts/n8655
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Re: What's the best type of training?

Post by ekalina » Tue Jan 12, 2021 11:58 am

I recently revisited TFTNA and perused some of the resources on their website (https://www.uphillathlete.com/). I am committing to put the principles into practice this year and see how it goes. In the past, I've ran 3–5 miles about 3-4 times per week at 8:30 min/mile. This has always been near my anaerobic threshold, between HR zones 3 and 4. My pace and endurance have mostly plateaued over the years, and that is why I want to try this TFTNA experiment. I would like to be able to one day run a half marathon or a marathon at 8:30 min/mile pace, and I know I cannot maintain that pace for much more than 5 miles now, even in flat terrain.

Over the weekend, I performed a heart rate drift test using a chest-strap HR monitor and found that my aerobic threshold is at about 140 bpm. I have started running at or below that HR, and will continue doing it. To maintain that pace, I need to run very slowly on flat terrain, around 12 min/mile, which is an effort in itself. In theory, if I stick with this training, my pace at 140 bpm should slowly improve, and my aerobic threshold HR should slowly increase.

I am also doing some of the bodyweight-based strength exercises from the TFTNA book. Unsure how much impact they will have at this stage.

Anyway, we will see how it goes. I'll report back if anyone's interested.
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Re: What's the best type of training?

Post by mtree » Tue Jan 12, 2021 12:28 pm

Some folks insist. Why? Dunno.
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Re: What's the best type of training?

Post by CaptainSuburbia » Tue Jan 12, 2021 1:02 pm

The best training is racquetball. Might as well have fun.
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Re: What's the best type of training?

Post by TomPierce » Tue Jan 12, 2021 1:15 pm

ekalina wrote:
Tue Jan 12, 2021 11:58 am
I recently revisited TFTNA and perused some of the resources on their website (https://www.uphillathlete.com/). I am committing to put the principles into practice this year and see how it goes. In the past, I've ran 3–5 miles about 3-4 times per week at 8:30 min/mile. This has always been near my anaerobic threshold, between HR zones 3 and 4. My pace and endurance have mostly plateaued over the years, and that is why I want to try this TFTNA experiment. I would like to be able to one day run a half marathon or a marathon at 8:30 min/mile pace, and I know I cannot maintain that pace for much more than 5 miles now, even in flat terrain.

Over the weekend, I performed a heart rate drift test using a chest-strap HR monitor and found that my aerobic threshold is at about 140 bpm. I have started running at or below that HR, and will continue doing it. To maintain that pace, I need to run very slowly on flat terrain, around 12 min/mile, which is an effort in itself. In theory, if I stick with this training, my pace at 140 bpm should slowly improve, and my aerobic threshold HR should slowly increase.

I am also doing some of the bodyweight-based strength exercises from the TFTNA book. Unsure how much impact they will have at this stage.

Anyway, we will see how it goes. I'll report back if anyone's interested.
Ekalina: Sounds like a pretty thoughtful, objective approach. Good luck with your program!

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Re: What's the best type of training?

Post by timisimaginary » Wed Jan 13, 2021 8:51 am

ekalina wrote:
Tue Jan 12, 2021 11:58 am
I recently revisited TFTNA and perused some of the resources on their website (https://www.uphillathlete.com/). I am committing to put the principles into practice this year and see how it goes. In the past, I've ran 3–5 miles about 3-4 times per week at 8:30 min/mile. This has always been near my anaerobic threshold, between HR zones 3 and 4. My pace and endurance have mostly plateaued over the years, and that is why I want to try this TFTNA experiment. I would like to be able to one day run a half marathon or a marathon at 8:30 min/mile pace, and I know I cannot maintain that pace for much more than 5 miles now, even in flat terrain.

Over the weekend, I performed a heart rate drift test using a chest-strap HR monitor and found that my aerobic threshold is at about 140 bpm. I have started running at or below that HR, and will continue doing it. To maintain that pace, I need to run very slowly on flat terrain, around 12 min/mile, which is an effort in itself. In theory, if I stick with this training, my pace at 140 bpm should slowly improve, and my aerobic threshold HR should slowly increase.

I am also doing some of the bodyweight-based strength exercises from the TFTNA book. Unsure how much impact they will have at this stage.

Anyway, we will see how it goes. I'll report back if anyone's interested.
i tried this approach last year, and found it very frustrating and unfortunately not very effective for me. trying to keep my heart rate in Z1-Z2 turns running into a boring chore, and since i run almost exclusively on trails, almost impossible as well. no matter how flat or well-groomed a trail, it takes more effort than running roads or tracks. also, while aerobic base definitely matters in improving your running times, running efficiency is equally if not more important. improving efficiency will allow you to run faster with less effort. but the best way to teach your body to run fast, is by running fast. speedwork and drills are going to be an important part of that, and that means doing stuff like intervals of varying lengths at Z4-5, hill repeats, strides, etc.

i've decided this year to just ignore the HR on runs and focus on RPE instead, trying to keep the overall run in the easy zones but not worrying if my HR briefly jumps during a hill or tough section of trail, and then making sure i get at least 1-2 days a week of speedwork and tempo runs. as for base work, there are plenty of other ways to train your base besides running: stair climbing (a stepmill or incline treadmill is great for this), or cycling can be easier and more fun to do while maintaining an aerobic-level effort. when it comes to base training, the heart pumps the same way regardless of what your body is doing, so anything that gets you into the proper HR zone works as base training. i'd rather save my running for the harder (and more fun) training days.
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