How does the Wasatch range in Utah compare to other ranges in the west?

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Jbrow327
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How does the Wasatch range in Utah compare to other ranges in the west?

Post by Jbrow327 » Sun May 10, 2020 3:36 pm

I have lived in Utah my entire life. I have never been to the front range area of Colorado. The Leadville/Aspen area is the farthest east I have been in Colorado. That was a long time ago so I don't remember much. I feel very geographically spoiled, if you will, growing up in this state. I feel like the Wasatch range is one of the most impressive ranges in the west and I could be totally wrong. That's why I'm here asking. How does the Wasatch compare to other ranges in the western USA? People driving east on interstate 80 are probably amazed once they see the long north south wall of impenetrable looking mountains.
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Re: How does the Wasatch range in Utah compare to other ranges in the west?

Post by Jorts » Sun May 10, 2020 3:51 pm

What are you asking? Vertical relief? Development density? Average elevation? Backcountry crowds? Ruggedness? Type of geologic formations? Maybe you are curious about average snow depth? snow density? avalanche stability? Or do you not care about snowpack at all?

This question is so ridiculously broad. Be more specific.
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Re: How does the Wasatch range in Utah compare to other ranges in the west?

Post by Jbrow327 » Sun May 10, 2020 3:59 pm

Vertical relief and size of the range. What is development density?
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Re: How does the Wasatch range in Utah compare to other ranges in the west?

Post by seano » Sun May 10, 2020 4:30 pm

The Wasatch are small and thin, with pretty good relief to the West. They remind me a bit of the Tetons (7k relief), but flipped E-W, and with a hellish and polluted city on one side.

The CO Rockies, Winds, Cascades, Sierra, etc. are all larger and more complex, and the High Sierra have about 10k of abrupt relief to the East.
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Re: How does the Wasatch range in Utah compare to other ranges in the west?

Post by Jbrow327 » Sun May 10, 2020 4:37 pm

seano wrote:
Sun May 10, 2020 4:30 pm
The Wasatch are small and thin, with pretty good relief to the West. They remind me a bit of the Tetons (7k relief), but flipped E-W, and with a hellish and polluted city on one side.

The CO Rockies, Winds, Cascades, Sierra, etc. are all larger and more complex, and the High Sierra have about 10k of abrupt relief to the East.
Thanks. What do you mean flipped east west? Both the Tetons and Wasatch run north south.
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Re: How does the Wasatch range in Utah compare to other ranges in the west?

Post by Conor » Sun May 10, 2020 5:20 pm

Jbrow327 wrote:
Sun May 10, 2020 4:37 pm
seano wrote:
Sun May 10, 2020 4:30 pm
The Wasatch are small and thin, with pretty good relief to the West. They remind me a bit of the Tetons (7k relief), but flipped E-W, and with a hellish and polluted city on one side.

The CO Rockies, Winds, Cascades, Sierra, etc. are all larger and more complex, and the High Sierra have about 10k of abrupt relief to the East.
Thanks. What do you mean flipped east west? Both the Tetons and Wasatch run north south.
I believe he means the direction of the main access points/cities.
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Re: How does the Wasatch range in Utah compare to other ranges in the west?

Post by blakhawk » Sun May 10, 2020 7:08 pm

If you like vertical relief and size head the other way to the PNW volcanoes/Washington Cascades. Nothing in the Rockies comes quite close to those in that regard imo. Also the Sierra from the East has a big rise as well. Even badwater to telescope peak in death valley has a big rise. As does san jacinto in socal.

But one thing that Colorado does dominate in is all the vast area above treeline. Some places from up high it feels like your in a sea of Alpine peaks all around you as far as the eye can see ; versus a more singular range further apart from other ranges like the Wasatch.

Jus my 2 cents from what I've seen
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Re: How does the Wasatch range in Utah compare to other ranges in the west?

Post by Scott P » Sun May 10, 2020 7:23 pm

blakhawk wrote:
Sun May 10, 2020 7:08 pm
But one thing that Colorado does dominate in is all the vast area above treeline. Some places from up high it feels like your in a sea of Alpine peaks all around you as far as the eye can see ; versus a more singular range further apart from other ranges like the Wasatch.
The Uinta Mountains east of the Wasatch have the largest contiguous area above timberline in the US.
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Re: How does the Wasatch range in Utah compare to other ranges in the west?

Post by blakhawk » Sun May 10, 2020 7:38 pm

Scott P wrote:
Sun May 10, 2020 7:23 pm
blakhawk wrote:
Sun May 10, 2020 7:08 pm
But one thing that Colorado does dominate in is all the vast area above treeline. Some places from up high it feels like your in a sea of Alpine peaks all around you as far as the eye can see ; versus a more singular range further apart from other ranges like the Wasatch.
The Uinta Mountains east of the Wasatch have the largest contiguous area above timberline in the US.
I know that...but I said the state of Colorado as a whole(there's a difference imo)versus just one intact range/land above treeline,and how much closer the Alpine ranges are to each other. San Juans may not all be intact above tree line like the uintahs,but they cover a larger area. Even the elks/sawatch mass is a big area. Right across from that is the tenmlie/mosquito,and the sangres running south picking up where the sawatch leaves off. The uintahs only have the Wasatch perpendicular to them with nothing else to the north or south or east close by like the ranges in Colorado do. I shouldn't have to explain this to you. ;)
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Re: How does the Wasatch range in Utah compare to other ranges in the west?

Post by blakhawk » Sun May 10, 2020 8:21 pm

Another huge area of Alpine mountain ranges all packed closely into each other like Colorado is from the northern winds over to the Tetons,and North thru the sea of the Absarokas,and then the Beartooths rise and begin immediately from them. Love that whole area.

But I still think the PNW has the biggest and more impressive mountains in the lower 48. (Ok...flame me away again..lol)
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Re: How does the Wasatch range in Utah compare to other ranges in the west?

Post by spiderman » Sun May 10, 2020 8:41 pm

blakhawk wrote:
Sun May 10, 2020 8:21 pm
But I still think the PNW has the biggest and more impressive mountains in the lower 48. (Ok...flame me away again..lol)
Hard to flame you for speaking the truth.
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Re: How does the Wasatch range in Utah compare to other ranges in the west?

Post by cottonmountaineering » Sun May 10, 2020 9:51 pm

blakhawk wrote:
Sun May 10, 2020 8:21 pm
Another huge area of Alpine mountain ranges all packed closely into each other like Colorado is from the northern winds over to the Tetons,and North thru the sea of the Absarokas,and then the Beartooths rise and begin immediately from them. Love that whole area.

But I still think the PNW has the biggest and more impressive mountains in the lower 48. (Ok...flame me away again..lol)
pnw has great mountains, but they are socked in for about 8 months out of the year
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