When did you first start climbing Mountains?

FAQ and threads for those just starting to hike the Colorado 14ers.
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When did you first start climbing mountains?

Before 1960s
3
2%
1960s
11
8%
1970s
19
14%
1980s
15
11%
1990s
20
15%
2000s
25
18%
2010s
44
32%
 
Total votes: 137
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nyker
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Re: When did you first start climbing Mountains?

Post by nyker » Thu Sep 06, 2018 9:04 pm

I grew up at about 50ft above sea level, the highest point within a hundred miles driving was about +400ft above sea level. Huge. There was an American Flag on that hill to mark it. First time I saw a mountain of sorts was 1993, first time I climbed a mountain was Autumn 1993, but I didn't think of it as a mountain much less mountaineering, I didn't even know that term until years later. It was just hiking in the woods and I was in the woods all the time and hiked many "hills" the names I don't even remember, I probably never knew their names, I just walked in the woods, there was a hill I walked up, some of these hills were characterized as mountains I suppose. When living upstate New York later, I bought my first pair of "real boots" looking back at some old photos, they were actually an early pair of Asolos that I bought at EMS. These looked very different and much cheaper than modern "hi tech" Asolos but I thought that and my school book bag was all I needed to be "in the mountains". I didn't fly on a plane to anywhere meaningful until 2001 when I went to Arizona and took that Saturday off after work and for the first time saw a snow capped peak, I'd recognize years later to be Mount Humphreys, which I've yet to climb. My first real ascent to a higher altitude mountain (above a few hundred feet) was Half Dome in 2003. That started it. I loved it and clinging on those cables for dear life scared the crap out of me :shock: , but loved it anyway and to this day despite the crowds now (and permit required now! :? ), ranks as one of my all time favorite hikes. On that hike, I was dreadfully unprepared for hiking at altitude and not fit for "endurance" and was the first time I was above treeline looking down at the trees. Awesome.
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Candace66
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Re: When did you first start climbing Mountains?

Post by Candace66 » Fri Sep 07, 2018 9:46 pm

First entry on my peaks list is Pinnacle Mountain near Little Rock, Arkansas, 1989! \:D/

(I'm not from AR, I'm from SoCal...I was in my 20's before I was even half-seriously doing outdoors things.)

In 1992, I came out with the Arkansas Pikes Peak Marathon Society* to do the Pikes Peak Ascent race. And got hooked on real mountains! :lol:


* Yes there really is such an organization! But nowadays it is a shadow of its former self...
"One criterion for climbing a peak is that you should gain a vertical height under your own power equal to your peak's rise from its highest connecting saddle with a neighbor peak...Beyond this minimum gain, you are free to gain as much altitude as your peak-bagging conscience requires." - Gerry Roach, "Colorado 14ers" :wink:
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JChitwood
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Re: When did you first start climbing Mountains?

Post by JChitwood » Sun Sep 09, 2018 1:06 am

July 21, 1994 on Sneffels. The entire day was a comedy of errors and luck shined brightly on my group. Didn't even leave Telluride until 10 am, drove over Imogene in a rental Ford Explorer having never been off road before, upon parking at the trailhead a shock blew loudly, ascended the snow wondering if we should have those spiky mining pick and pokey foot thingys, on the summit at 5 pm with barely a cloud in the sky. Still remember sunset in the Ouray Hot Springs and Mexican food after. What a day.
"I'll make it." - Jimmy Chitwood
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