Beginner looking for guidance

FAQ and threads for those just starting to hike the Colorado 14ers.
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brichardsson
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Re: Beginner looking for guidance

Post by brichardsson » Wed Aug 22, 2018 8:42 pm

billycox wrote:
fact: guess what takes up nearly half of the ocean's plastic waste. just guess. and no, it's not straws, or bottles.

Commercial fishing gear. Nets.
give the man a cigar.
Daggermonkey
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Re: Beginner looking for guidance

Post by Daggermonkey » Thu Aug 23, 2018 8:01 am

brichardsson wrote:
billycox wrote:
fact: guess what takes up nearly half of the ocean's plastic waste. just guess. and no, it's not straws, or bottles.

Commercial fishing gear. Nets.
give the man a cigar.

Anyone else got a hankerin for some red lobster (or similar)?
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nyker
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Re: Beginner looking for guidance

Post by nyker » Thu Aug 23, 2018 8:05 am

People often take one of two views on building their gear chest:

1. Just get what you need now for your immediate plans and then upgrade later or fix when it breaks. It's quicker, cheaper initial investment and works for the task at hand.

2. Think about your longer term plans and buy gear that will last rather then spending more replacing items that might
be lower quality, wear out faster or not the best fit for what you need. You'll spend more upfront, but save money in the long run. This is a better option if you know the gear that works for you, if not, some trial and error/testing is needed to figure out what works best, i.e. more like option 1.

I often wonder how folks are fine spending $50k on a recreational 4x4 but then don't want to spend $150 for a good pair of shoes.

Anyway...

The one thing I would not neglect is your footwear. After all, that will be your contact point all day with the ground, where the rubber hits the road, literally.

Personally, I'd advise against normal sneakers, since they're pretty flimsy, the bottom of your feet will likely hurt
at the end of the day or during the day and they typically don't have great traction if worn out slightly, especially when wet.
You don't need super expensive footwear but a low cut waterproof hiking shoe or trailrunner should get you up all the
Class 1 and Class 2 peaks unless you have a need for higher cut hiking boot.

Often, weight will be a determinant of cost for similar items and is usually inversely correlated with price. if you're willing to carry more weight,
you'll save money for effectively the same functionality.

All things equal, the same item which weighs less will cost more, i.e. titanium or carbon fiber trekking poles vs aluminum or steel,
or ultralight 850 fill down sleeping bag vs the $50 sale item that weighs 5lbs.

Agree with comments above about not overthinking, and Keeping it simple but ...be sufficiently prepared. We all like to think every day we are on a mountain will be blue skies, warm and calm winds, but it rarely works out that way. So, while on a perfect day, you can certainly summit a peak in jeans, sneakers and a t-shirt carrying a gallon jug of water in one hand and nothing else, should weather deviate from ideal conditions (probable) or you get tired and you're out longer that you planned, slip, fall, get offroute, lost, etc, you want some extra protection and more proper gear to help deal with that.

So... Considering your budget and costs:

Go to REI or other outdoor store and see what's on sale, sometimes last season stuff can be found with nice discounts. Online is great too, but if you don't know your size and fit, buying clothes and packs can be tough sight unseen.
Check Craigslist or yard sales. Quality gear that's not broken or ripped can last a while and there's nothing wrong with buying used stuff.
(don't buy used climbing rope or a used harness though)

Backpack - there are tons of good ~30-35L daypacks out there that can be found on sale or used. Get one that feels good.
Pants/shirt - ideally pants and shirts that are NOT cotton, but synthetic - gym clothes, running shirts work, any "hiking" pant will work (REI, TNF, EMS, Columbia, all make good pants)
Layers - Non cotton T shirt and insulating layer (fleece or wool sweater or down sweater)
Shell - waterproof and windproof with a cinchable hood. A softshell is nice to have also, but I'd say the waterproof shell is more important if you need to chose only one for budget reasons. Shell pants are good to have for shoulder seasons.
Socks - wool socks, I like Smartwool brand or similar
Water - use your empty gatorade, plastic water bottles (all free since you have them already) - you can always buy a bladder if that suits you.
Food - you'll have to experiment with what works, everyone is different and everyone's body reacts differently to eating at altitude
Trekking poles - can be pricy. for the first couple years, I used a stick (free at trailhead or find in forest). If you want a pair I find LEKI is best.

Other gear like compass, map, hat, gloves, sunblock, headlamp, assume you can figure that all out.

Good luck and enjoy the mountains!
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chicagostylehotdog
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Re: Beginner looking for guidance

Post by chicagostylehotdog » Thu Aug 23, 2018 8:19 am

nyker wrote:So... Considering your budget and costs:

Go to REI or other outdoor store and see what's on sale, sometimes last season stuff can be found with nice discounts. Online is great too, but if you don't know your size and fit, buying clothes and packs can be tough sight unseen.
Check Craigslist or yard sales. Quality gear that's not broken or ripped can last a while and there's nothing wrong with buying used stuff.
(don't buy used climbing rope or a used harness though)
REI (just recently?) added a used section to their website, https://www.rei.com/used. You can now shop used goods that are often heavily discounted. Each item has a description of the level of wear and any damage.

Also, a reminder to use the link on the front page of 14ers.com when purchasing anything from REI.
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Paula
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Re: Beginner looking for guidance

Post by Paula » Thu Aug 23, 2018 10:00 am

Conor wrote:
Daggermonkey wrote:
I wonder how many people bring pizza?
I do on overnight trips.
Pizza packs as easily as a sandwich, but tastes better and squishes less easily. It's perfect trail food.

If you're saving weight by bringing mediocre food options, I'm not saying you're wrong, but we're going to have to agree to disagree on the validity of your life choices.
19780722_10105314020831553_3210171031541168545_o.jpg
19780722_10105314020831553_3210171031541168545_o.jpg (567.61 KiB) Viewed 978 times
justiner wrote:^^^ This person foods.
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justiner
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Re: Beginner looking for guidance

Post by justiner » Thu Aug 23, 2018 10:16 am

^^^ This person foods.
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stephakett
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Re: Beginner looking for guidance

Post by stephakett » Thu Aug 23, 2018 10:22 am

this is amazing. here i thought i was getting too fancy with my loaf of bread, salami, and beer. i am so happy to be proven wrong... maybe i should start bringing my stove in the fall: summit starbucks, anyone?
“My father considered a walk among the mountains as the equivalent of churchgoing.” (Aldous Huxley)
Ptglhs
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Re: Beginner looking for guidance

Post by Ptglhs » Thu Aug 23, 2018 10:24 am

stephakett wrote:this is amazing. here i thought i was getting too fancy with my loaf of bread, salami, and beer. i am so happy to be proven wrong... maybe i should start bringing my stove in the fall: summit starbucks, anyone?
But then you'd have to drink coffee. Why would you do that? It tastes as bad as beer but without the effect of getting buzzed... Hot chocolate at least tastes good!
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stephakett
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Re: Beginner looking for guidance

Post by stephakett » Thu Aug 23, 2018 10:54 am

Ptglhs wrote:
stephakett wrote:this is amazing. here i thought i was getting too fancy with my loaf of bread, salami, and beer. i am so happy to be proven wrong... maybe i should start bringing my stove in the fall: summit starbucks, anyone?
But then you'd have to drink coffee. Why would you do that? It tastes as bad as beer but without the effect of getting buzzed... Hot chocolate at least tastes good!
i'll bring a packet of hot cocoa just for you O:)
“My father considered a walk among the mountains as the equivalent of churchgoing.” (Aldous Huxley)
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LURE
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Re: Beginner looking for guidance

Post by LURE » Thu Aug 23, 2018 11:02 am

Donuts guys. Summit donuts.

I'm a real big fan of leftover pizza. Will always love my five layer burritos though.
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Re: Beginner looking for guidance

Post by Ptglhs » Thu Aug 23, 2018 11:27 am

stephakett wrote:
Ptglhs wrote:
stephakett wrote:this is amazing. here i thought i was getting too fancy with my loaf of bread, salami, and beer. i am so happy to be proven wrong... maybe i should start bringing my stove in the fall: summit starbucks, anyone?
But then you'd have to drink coffee. Why would you do that? It tastes as bad as beer but without the effect of getting buzzed... Hot chocolate at least tastes good!
i'll bring a packet of hot cocoa just for you O:)
I'm not sure that asking ever person named Steph I encounter on a 14er if they brought coco for me is the best way to make new friends... :D
Ptglhs
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Re: Beginner looking for guidance

Post by Ptglhs » Thu Aug 23, 2018 11:27 am

LURE wrote:Donuts guys. Summit donuts.

I'm a real big fan of leftover pizza. Will always love my five layer burritos though.
Five layer burritos sound like a better TH food before the hike. It would give you a little extra propulsion up the mountain.
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