Page 4 of 6

Re: Good overnight '14er for a beginner?

Posted: Thu Jan 30, 2020 4:07 pm
by Ptglhs
Are we talking about degrees or about percentage? A 45-degree slope is also a 100% slope. Not trying to be pedantic or a moron, just the photos posted look a lot more like degrees than percent.

Re: Good overnight '14er for a beginner?

Posted: Thu Jan 30, 2020 4:18 pm
by highpilgrim
Ptglhs wrote:
Thu Jan 30, 2020 4:07 pm
Are we talking about degrees or about percentage? A 45-degree slope is also a 100% slope. Not trying to be pedantic or a moron, just the photos posted look a lot more like degrees than percent.
You're right.

Grade is a unit function. 5 units in 100 is a five percent grade. 100 units in 100 is a hundred percent grade. And also a 45 degree slope.

70 degrees and 70 percent are not the same.

I should read faster than I type. #-o

Re: Good overnight '14er for a beginner?

Posted: Thu Jan 30, 2020 9:04 pm
by Cruiser
SchralpTheGnar wrote:
Thu Jan 30, 2020 4:06 pm
IMO the benefits of not backpacking are better sleep, better food, better drink, less impact to the environment, and when you start hiking low you stay warm all day. The benefits of backpacking include a better campsite and a closer approach the 2nd day. For me not backpacking wins every time and you could do all the 14ers and never backpack once in your life.
Agreed! But op is obviously a masochist who is into sleep deprivation and less beer (cuz it's too heavy to pack in very far). Hence my suggestion to head south.

Another great spot that I keep meaning to spend a night at is the bristlecone grove at ~11500' above the old Jennings creek trailhead for Tabeguache. That area is remarkably beautiful and sees very little traffic. I bet you could set up a pretty plush camp in there. Then you could hike Tab in the morning and traverse over to Shavano for a 2fer if the weather cooperates.

Re: Good overnight '14er for a beginner?

Posted: Thu Jan 30, 2020 9:51 pm
by Ptglhs
SchralpTheGnar wrote:
Thu Jan 30, 2020 4:06 pm
you could do all the 14ers and never backpack once in your life.
Chicago Basin?

Re: Good overnight '14er for a beginner?

Posted: Fri Jan 31, 2020 6:53 am
by Cruiser
Schralp day trips the Chicago basin peaks from Purgatory in blue jean shorts and flip flops for a casual summer outing with his best gal. Ain't no thang!

Re: Good overnight '14er for a beginner?

Posted: Fri Jan 31, 2020 9:11 am
by mtree
I agree San Luis could be a GREAT backpacking trip for an easy peak. Its gorgeous back there. Very few people.

Re: Good overnight '14er for a beginner?

Posted: Fri Jan 31, 2020 9:20 am
by climbingcue
Ptglhs wrote:
Thu Jan 30, 2020 9:51 pm
SchralpTheGnar wrote:
Thu Jan 30, 2020 4:06 pm
you could do all the 14ers and never backpack once in your life.
Chicago Basin?
That is the same thing I was thinking, but according to his check list he has never done Chicago basin. Maybe his list excludes those four peaks. If you start from purgatory it is 16 miles in, and then 10 miles to do all four peaks in one go. Then 16 miles out, not something I could or would want to do in a single day. We did hike the 16 miles in with backpacking gear for multiple over nights in under 6 hours so we were moving pretty well.

Bill

Re: Good overnight '14er for a beginner?

Posted: Fri Jan 31, 2020 10:23 am
by CaptainSuburbia
climbingcue wrote:
Fri Jan 31, 2020 9:20 am
Ptglhs wrote:
Thu Jan 30, 2020 9:51 pm
SchralpTheGnar wrote:
Thu Jan 30, 2020 4:06 pm
you could do all the 14ers and never backpack once in your life.
Chicago Basin?
That is the same thing I was thinking, but according to his check list he has never done Chicago basin. Maybe his list excludes those four peaks. If you start from purgatory it is 16 miles in, and then 10 miles to do all four peaks in one go. Then 16 miles out, not something I could or would want to do in a single day. We did hike the 16 miles in with backpacking gear for multiple over nights in under 6 hours so we were moving pretty well.

Bill
It's 13 miles in from Purgatory. Last summer on my last day in there I climbed 3 of the peaks then hiked out to Purgatory. The hardest part of the weekend was carry camping supplies 26 miles. Assuming nice weather, I don't see why you couldn't do it without a camp.

Re: Good overnight '14er for a beginner?

Posted: Fri Jan 31, 2020 10:50 am
by zinj
KRBoyce wrote:
Wed Jan 29, 2020 10:00 am
Maybe consider Pikes Peak via Barr Trial. Its a beastly 22 mile round trip, but you can spend the night at Barr camp, and finish the mountain the next day. Plus if you decide you don't want to hike all the way back down you could have someone drive to the top to pick you up.
This.

You can go 'backpack lite' by taking just your day stuff plus a sleeping bag - sack out at the bar camp. They even have food. Good way to break up the Pikes ascent.

Re: Good overnight '14er for a beginner?

Posted: Fri Jan 31, 2020 11:04 am
by Ptglhs
CaptainSuburbia wrote:
Fri Jan 31, 2020 10:23 am
It's 13 miles in from Purgatory. Last summer on my last day in there I climbed 3 of the peaks then hiked out to Purgatory. The hardest part of the weekend was carry camping supplies 26 miles. Assuming nice weather, I don't see why you couldn't do it without a camp.
Minimum 38 miles round trip with 10k+ of elevation gain? If that's your idea of a day trip you're on a totally different level of endurance performance than most people. I did Chicago Basin as a 4 day. 1st afternoon hiked to near the animals river trail split, 2nd to the upper end of the Basin and rest, 3rd sunlight/Windom, 4th Eolus' and all the way out. Day 4 was a tough day. Even with a pack that was 20lbs lighter Idk how one would do out and back in a day. I recall thinking doing the hike all the way in to the Basin in one day would have been possible, if I car camped at the TH or got a room in Durango. Driving 6 hours then hiking for 15 miles with 3k of gain would also be a long day.

Re: Good overnight '14er for a beginner?

Posted: Fri Jan 31, 2020 8:05 pm
by climbingcue
CaptainSuburbia wrote:
Fri Jan 31, 2020 10:23 am

It's 13 miles in from Purgatory. Last summer on my last day in there I climbed 3 of the peaks then hiked out to Purgatory. The hardest part of the weekend was carry camping supplies 26 miles. Assuming nice weather, I don't see why you couldn't do it without a camp.
My GPS data from the hike in 16 miles

https://www.strava.com/activities/2667725250

Re: Good overnight '14er for a beginner?

Posted: Fri Jan 31, 2020 8:59 pm
by Trotter
chiggiebeeeese wrote:
Wed Jan 29, 2020 9:46 am
I am pretty new to the whole 14er scene, as I have only climbed one. I was wanting to take a trip with some buddies this summer and backpack a 14er, preferably camping one
or two nights. We did Humboldt peak last summer, and while the South Colony lakes are awesome, that hike was a beast because we didnt have a car that could make it up to the 4wd trailhead haha. I was wondering if there are any good peaks with a good camping area (lake, stream, etc nearby for water) that would be good for a few beginners.
For people with only one 14er summit, I'd stay away from some of the tougher suggestions, and do an easy 14er and car camp the night before. But If you really want to backpack, pikes via Barr, or San Luis are good gentle choices, with San Luis being much more remote and wilderness feeling.