Injured hiker air lifted off Maroon Peak

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myfeetrock
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Re: Injured hiker air lifted off Maroon Peak

Post by myfeetrock » Thu Aug 30, 2018 9:12 am

timstich wrote:I would like to point out that the Facebook 14er group would never allow such a glorious thread as this one to exist. :mrgreen:
I posted a picture of a fortune from a cookie I got that read " for help on quandary one must ask for help from someone with knowledge of quandary". I thought it was funny and mountain related, but "those" guys deleted the post because it was not mountain related. People liked it, but no picture of mountains then not post worthy.
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Re: Injured hiker air lifted off Maroon Peak

Post by myfeetrock » Thu Aug 30, 2018 9:17 am

highpilgrim wrote:not every Texan can be Gus, or Captain Call.
Indeed. The Captain should have come out though and said "I'm your dad". I guess that's why it's such a great show. Love it!
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Re: Injured hiker air lifted off Maroon Peak

Post by Terminally_Chill » Thu Aug 30, 2018 8:52 pm

AnnaG22 wrote:
robshock_12 wrote:
earthtobean wrote:Another Texan getting a free ride in a chopper.... Hope he had a cosar card at least
Seriously, a couple weeks ago I posted about my concerns with inexperienced/unprepared flat landers on these peaks. While some agreed with me, others saw it as me just complaining. These are not peaks you should be attempting on your summer vacation, while you are doing nothing to prepare for them the rest of the year. Let’s see how many Texans get sad about these comments...truth is there are way to many of them here, it’s pretty annoying. I’ve worked in the service industry in the mountains and most are rude and entitled.
So... to what degree does it matter that he is from out of state?

While I agree that the volume of people on harder peaks is worrisome, somebody getting injured or needing rescue does not automatically mean they're inexperienced. That kind of logic would label Alan Arnette as "inexperienced unprepared." And snide remarks aren't going to reduce the number of people in the high peaks. But kind, patient, friendly outreach and stewardship can help them be safer.

And as for the dig toward Texans...I too have worked in the service industry in the mountains. I disagree on the rude point. Most people are pretty nice if you are nice to them (in the service industry, after all, that IS a lot of what you're getting paid to do). Moreover, Texans (used here to represent mountain tourists in general) largely sustain mountain town economies.



My grandpa lead the volunteer force that prevented the damn Texans from invading Colorado and New Mexico during the civil war. I will agree that there are too many people moving to Colorado from out east and turning the mountains into a theme park.
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Re: Injured hiker air lifted off Maroon Peak

Post by Terminally_Chill » Thu Aug 30, 2018 8:53 pm

robshock_12 wrote:
earthtobean wrote:Another Texan getting a free ride in a chopper.... Hope he had a cosar card at least
Seriously, a couple weeks ago I posted about my concerns with inexperienced/unprepared flat landers on these peaks. While some agreed with me, others saw it as me just complaining. These are not peaks you should be attempting on your summer vacation, while you are doing nothing to prepare for them the rest of the year. Let’s see how many Texans get sad about these comments...truth is there are way to many of them here, it’s pretty annoying. I’ve worked in the service industry in the mountains and most are rude and entitled.

lol love it.
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Re: Injured hiker air lifted off Maroon Peak

Post by TraversingTrash » Fri Aug 31, 2018 9:28 am

Having grown up all over the US (Florida, Massachusetts, Ohio, Texas, and currently residing in Colorado) and road tripping between all these states, I have found that there are pompous attitudes everywhere regarding one's "native" status to a state (except, admittedly Ohio....).

But now, let's focus on the real issue at hand:

https://kdvr.com/2018/04/01/more-lions- ... -colorado/

Wishing this human, Mr. Brewer a speedy recovery, and many more enjoyable days in the mountains!
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Re: Injured hiker air lifted off Maroon Peak

Post by Harrison » Tue Sep 11, 2018 6:38 am

robshock_12 wrote:
earthtobean wrote:Another Texan getting a free ride in a chopper.... Hope he had a cosar card at least
Seriously, a couple weeks ago I posted about my concerns with inexperienced/unprepared flat landers on these peaks. While some agreed with me, others saw it as me just complaining. These are not peaks you should be attempting on your summer vacation, while you are doing nothing to prepare for them the rest of the year. Let’s see how many Texans get sad about these comments...truth is there are way to many of them here, it’s pretty annoying. I’ve worked in the service industry in the mountains and most are rude and entitled.
As a flat lander, I agree, but I'm also curious - what do you suggest to prepare for these hikes? I don't think the allure of the mountains will end anytime soon. I intend to hike all the 14ers over the next decade, building experience on higher classification and looser rock routes over the coming years as I work my way toward the Elks. At the end of the day, I only have so many chances to be in the mountains, and I want to be as prepared as possible to take on challenging hikes and hard runs.


Genuinely curious on how I can better myself (and anyone joining me) for these hikes, aside from 'being smart' and only taking on routes I feel comfortable with doing.
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Re: Injured hiker air lifted off Maroon Peak

Post by nunns » Tue Sep 11, 2018 7:40 am

Harrison wrote:
robshock_12 wrote:
earthtobean wrote:Another Texan getting a free ride in a chopper.... Hope he had a cosar card at least
Seriously, a couple weeks ago I posted about my concerns with inexperienced/unprepared flat landers on these peaks. While some agreed with me, others saw it as me just complaining. These are not peaks you should be attempting on your summer vacation, while you are doing nothing to prepare for them the rest of the year. Let’s see how many Texans get sad about these comments...truth is there are way to many of them here, it’s pretty annoying. I’ve worked in the service industry in the mountains and most are rude and entitled.
As a flat lander, I agree, but I'm also curious - what do you suggest to prepare for these hikes? I don't think the allure of the mountains will end anytime soon. I intend to hike all the 14ers over the next decade, building experience on higher classification and looser rock routes over the coming years as I work my way toward the Elks. At the end of the day, I only have so many chances to be in the mountains, and I want to be as prepared as possible to take on challenging hikes and hard runs.


Genuinely curious on how I can better myself (and anyone joining me) for these hikes, aside from 'being smart' and only taking on routes I feel comfortable with doing.
Without accusing the hiker that is the topic of this thread of anything, one main suggestion is to do what I know you are already doing: research the mountains, the climbs, and the routes, and build your difficulty gradually. Personally I think it foolhardy for almost anyone to try either of the Bells prior to having done a LOT of class 1-3 climbs and built their skill set up. Again, not saying anything about the injured hiker; I have no idea one way or the other what his experience level is. Personally I have the Maroon Bells scheduled to be in my final 14er push after I have climbed the 50 that are easier than they are.

Sean Nunn
Raytown MO
"Thy righteousness is like the great mountains." --Psalms 36:6
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Re: Injured hiker air lifted off Maroon Peak

Post by Wish I lived in CO » Tue Sep 11, 2018 7:41 am

Harrison wrote:
robshock_12 wrote:
earthtobean wrote:Another Texan getting a free ride in a chopper.... Hope he had a cosar card at least
Seriously, a couple weeks ago I posted about my concerns with inexperienced/unprepared flat landers on these peaks. While some agreed with me, others saw it as me just complaining. These are not peaks you should be attempting on your summer vacation, while you are doing nothing to prepare for them the rest of the year. Let’s see how many Texans get sad about these comments...truth is there are way to many of them here, it’s pretty annoying. I’ve worked in the service industry in the mountains and most are rude and entitled.
As a flat lander, I agree, but I'm also curious - what do you suggest to prepare for these hikes? I don't think the allure of the mountains will end anytime soon. I intend to hike all the 14ers over the next decade, building experience on higher classification and looser rock routes over the coming years as I work my way toward the Elks. At the end of the day, I only have so many chances to be in the mountains, and I want to be as prepared as possible to take on challenging hikes and hard runs.


Genuinely curious on how I can better myself (and anyone joining me) for these hikes, aside from 'being smart' and only taking on routes I feel comfortable with doing.
Don't be afraid to push yourself, and don't be afraid to turn back and call it a day if you're not feeling it. Done both many times.
I look up to the mountains - does my help come from there? My help comes from the Lord, who made heaven and earth! Psalm 121:1-2
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Re: Injured hiker air lifted off Maroon Peak

Post by Harrison » Tue Sep 11, 2018 8:52 am

Wish I lived in CO wrote:
Harrison wrote:
robshock_12 wrote:
Seriously, a couple weeks ago I posted about my concerns with inexperienced/unprepared flat landers on these peaks. While some agreed with me, others saw it as me just complaining. These are not peaks you should be attempting on your summer vacation, while you are doing nothing to prepare for them the rest of the year. Let’s see how many Texans get sad about these comments...truth is there are way to many of them here, it’s pretty annoying. I’ve worked in the service industry in the mountains and most are rude and entitled.
As a flat lander, I agree, but I'm also curious - what do you suggest to prepare for these hikes? I don't think the allure of the mountains will end anytime soon. I intend to hike all the 14ers over the next decade, building experience on higher classification and looser rock routes over the coming years as I work my way toward the Elks. At the end of the day, I only have so many chances to be in the mountains, and I want to be as prepared as possible to take on challenging hikes and hard runs.


Genuinely curious on how I can better myself (and anyone joining me) for these hikes, aside from 'being smart' and only taking on routes I feel comfortable with doing.
Don't be afraid to push yourself, and don't be afraid to turn back and call it a day if you're not feeling it. Done both many times.
Sounds good. I've turned back twice, once due to a lack of skills and once due to a storm. Both were disappointing, but as of now, both mountains are still there.

Thank you.
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Re: Injured hiker air lifted off Maroon Peak

Post by jladderud » Tue Sep 11, 2018 10:23 am

TraversingTrash wrote:
But now, let's focus on the real issue at hand:

https://kdvr.com/2018/04/01/more-lions- ... -colorado/

Wishing this human, Mr. Brewer a speedy recovery, and many more enjoyable days in the mountains!
Welcome to the forum--looks like you'll fit in well here!
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Re: Injured hiker air lifted off Maroon Peak

Post by KS Jude » Tue Sep 11, 2018 11:29 am

Harrison wrote:
robshock_12 wrote:
earthtobean wrote:Another Texan getting a free ride in a chopper.... Hope he had a cosar card at least
Seriously, a couple weeks ago I posted about my concerns with inexperienced/unprepared flat landers on these peaks. While some agreed with me, others saw it as me just complaining. These are not peaks you should be attempting on your summer vacation, while you are doing nothing to prepare for them the rest of the year. Let’s see how many Texans get sad about these comments...truth is there are way to many of them here, it’s pretty annoying. I’ve worked in the service industry in the mountains and most are rude and entitled.
As a flat lander, I agree, but I'm also curious - what do you suggest to prepare for these hikes? I don't think the allure of the mountains will end anytime soon. I intend to hike all the 14ers over the next decade, building experience on higher classification and looser rock routes over the coming years as I work my way toward the Elks. At the end of the day, I only have so many chances to be in the mountains, and I want to be as prepared as possible to take on challenging hikes and hard runs.


Genuinely curious on how I can better myself (and anyone joining me) for these hikes, aside from 'being smart' and only taking on routes I feel comfortable with doing.
As a fellow flatlander from the KC metro, there are several things I do locally to get ready for the more difficult hikes/climbs, including the things previously mentioned. Most important is to stay physically fit with both cardiovascular and strength training. In addition to preparing myself physically, to mentally prepare myself for the more difficult routes and exposure, the best remedy I've found is to regularly hit up the local rock climbing gym or crag. Doing this has given me confidence when moving on technical terrain and helps me remain calm/focused when there's high exposure in the mountains. Believe it or not, KC has a local crag, called Cliff Drive, just east of downtown. While Cliff Drive may not be a destination climbing area, it's an excellent resource for us in KC. The chossy nature of its limestone even provides excellent training for climbing on less than stellar rock, like in the Elks. I know sport climbing a 30-40ft vertical wall in Missouri isn't the same as climbing class 4 with 1'000+ ft of air below you in Colorado, but at least for me the feeling of the exposure was pretty much the same.
"Verso l'alto" - Bl. Pier Giorgio Frassati
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