Warmest but comfortable and long-distance boots

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Plugugly
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Re: Warmest but comfortable and long-distance boots

Post by Plugugly » Sun Dec 13, 2020 3:33 pm

:-D
elcap5 wrote:
Sun Dec 13, 2020 3:26 pm
Just FYI, the Bridger 10" is also one of the few insulated winter boots available in a "wide" EE size. Great for those with Sasquatch size feet, super comfortable.
Rudy can't fail.
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blazintoes
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Re: Warmest but comfortable and long-distance boots

Post by blazintoes » Mon Dec 14, 2020 6:59 am

This is a bit prima donna and high maintenance but to keep feet happy have driving socks and climbing socks. When you get to the TH change out of your driving socks because feet sweat and now your driving socks are damp. You may not feel it, but they are. Then powder your feet with baby powder to keep them dry and change into your clean warm climbing socks. That's my trick, clean dry socks and baby powder.
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Plugugly
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Re: Warmest but comfortable and long-distance boots

Post by Plugugly » Mon Dec 14, 2020 10:14 am

blazintoes wrote:
Mon Dec 14, 2020 6:59 am
This is a bit prima donna and high maintenance but to keep feet happy have driving socks and climbing socks. When you get to the TH change out of your driving socks because feet sweat and now your driving socks are damp. You may not feel it, but they are. Then powder your feet with baby powder to keep them dry and change into your clean warm climbing socks. That's my trick, clean dry socks and baby powder.
This is great stuff. Totally makes sense.
Rudy can't fail.
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climbingcue
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Re: Warmest but comfortable and long-distance boots

Post by climbingcue » Mon Dec 14, 2020 10:34 am

Plugugly wrote:
Mon Dec 14, 2020 10:14 am
blazintoes wrote:
Mon Dec 14, 2020 6:59 am
This is a bit prima donna and high maintenance but to keep feet happy have driving socks and climbing socks. When you get to the TH change out of your driving socks because feet sweat and now your driving socks are damp. You may not feel it, but they are. Then powder your feet with baby powder to keep them dry and change into your clean warm climbing socks. That's my trick, clean dry socks and baby powder.
This is great stuff. Totally makes sense.
Great advise, I always have driving socks and then change into the climbing socks at the trailhead.
Consecutive months with at least one 14er, 35 months.
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CaptCO
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Re: Warmest but comfortable and long-distance boots

Post by CaptCO » Mon Dec 14, 2020 3:46 pm

I prefer wearing socks for 3 trips in a row, works for me
"It's a thing if you want it to be a thing. What others think of something is irrelevant." -OldSchool
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Plugugly
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Re: Warmest but comfortable and long-distance boots

Post by Plugugly » Tue Dec 15, 2020 8:30 am

:mrgreen:
CaptCO wrote:
Mon Dec 14, 2020 3:46 pm
I prefer wearing socks for 3 trips in a row, works for me
Rudy can't fail.
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Re: Warmest but comfortable and long-distance boots

Post by HikerGuy » Tue Dec 15, 2020 9:31 am

blazintoes wrote:
Mon Dec 14, 2020 6:59 am
This is a bit prima donna and high maintenance but to keep feet happy have driving socks and climbing socks. When you get to the TH change out of your driving socks because feet sweat and now your driving socks are damp. You may not feel it, but they are.
+1 Always change into fresh (or dry) socks before a hike. I also carry an extra pair of socks in order to change out during the day if needed.
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Re: Warmest but comfortable and long-distance boots

Post by a forest » Tue Dec 15, 2020 10:01 am

HikerGuy wrote:
Tue Dec 15, 2020 9:31 am
blazintoes wrote:
Mon Dec 14, 2020 6:59 am
This is a bit prima donna and high maintenance but to keep feet happy have driving socks and climbing socks. When you get to the TH change out of your driving socks because feet sweat and now your driving socks are damp. You may not feel it, but they are.
+1 Always change into fresh (or dry) socks before a hike. I also carry an extra pair of socks in order to change out during the day if needed.
i bring one extra sock with me, and keep my phone in it
Last edited by a forest on Mon Dec 28, 2020 12:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Warmest but comfortable and long-distance boots

Post by a forest » Mon Dec 28, 2020 12:48 pm

I got the Oboz Bridger 10" Insulated B-dry (400g) about a week ago. Wore them around the house and did some short pavement walks outside. This morning I took them out in single digit temps and tromped around snowy hills for a few hours with some boulder scrambling. My other winter boots are Salewa Mt. Trainer mids and Salomon Malamute snowboard boots (and floppy Sorels). I wanted a boot to do long cold hikes with snowshoes or microspikes, maybe some mellow crampon climbs but I figure by the time of the season I'll be on anything that steep I'll be in the Salewas (which I understand aren't winter boots). I've spent about 10 100+ day seasons in the Malamute snowboard boot (4-5 pairs) and the Oboz Bridger feels very similar, much smaller footprint and more ankle movement though, if anyone is familiar with that boot. I use Salomon trail runners as well.

My feet did not get cold this morning, the boot had okay traction on snow covered boulders and was comfortable for walking on frozen dirt. The top of the boot seems more open around your ankle than any other boot I've worn. I didn't wear gaiters but had ski pants with a good adjustable cuff around the boot. I walked up and down hills in knee deep snow and didn't get any snow in the boot. However, if I'm expecting any snow over boot top (which is almost every trip) I won't be wearing this boot without gaiters or pants that can cinch over the boot, the gap is that open. I was hoping to be able to wear some type of soft shell pant but one posthole and it seems like you'd have a boot full of snow.

With the Salewa Mt Trainer I am used to being able to edge on rocks quite well, the Oboz of course doesn't perform as well in that regard.

I was also considering the Salomon Toundra and Salewa Raven 2. REI had this Oboz in my size so I went with that because of the dividend and possible in-store return. I'm not unhappy with the Bridger, it's warm and waterproof (so far), seems like not a bad $180 spent. Non-technical winter aggressive walking boot.
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Re: Warmest but comfortable and long-distance boots

Post by headsizeburrito » Mon Dec 28, 2020 2:42 pm

I picked up the Oboz Bridger 10" Insulated a couple weeks ago partly due to this thread and have worn them a few times. My impressions are about the same as a forest above me. I found them to have pretty good traction, good comfort, and good warmth. Worked well on an easy snowshoe day in RMNP recently and kept me comfortable on Decalibron with a combination of some postholing in loose dry snow on the approach and low teens temps plus high wind up on the summits/ridges. They are pretty thick around the ankle so with adjustable cuffs on my softshell pants I felt no need for gaiters and didn't have any issues with the cuffs riding up while postholing, but YMMV. Some reviews talked about them fitting a little snug and suggested sizing up 1/2 size which I did, but didn't feel strictly necessary. I'd say try on your normal size (with your regular winter socks) and the half size up and see for yourself. Overall pretty happy with them, they seem like a great option for non technical winter hiking. Haven't tried them on any real scrambling yet so can't speak to that part.
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Re: Warmest but comfortable and long-distance boots

Post by TomPierce » Mon Dec 28, 2020 3:09 pm

headsizeburrito wrote:
Mon Dec 28, 2020 2:42 pm
I picked up the Oboz Bridger 10" Insulated a couple weeks ago partly due to this thread and have worn them a few times. My impressions are about the same as a forest above me. I found them to have pretty good traction, good comfort, and good warmth. Worked well on an easy snowshoe day in RMNP recently and kept me comfortable on Decalibron with a combination of some postholing in loose dry snow on the approach and low teens temps plus high wind up on the summits/ridges. They are pretty thick around the ankle so with adjustable cuffs on my softshell pants I felt no need for gaiters and didn't have any issues with the cuffs riding up while postholing, but YMMV. Some reviews talked about them fitting a little snug and suggested sizing up 1/2 size which I did, but didn't feel strictly necessary. I'd say try on your normal size (with your regular winter socks) and the half size up and see for yourself. Overall pretty happy with them, they seem like a great option for non technical winter hiking. Haven't tried them on any real scrambling yet so can't speak to that part.
Headsize: No idea if this will work with your pants, but if you look under the hem and see a couple of opposing eyelets, hopefully metal, your pants are set up for internal gaiters. If so, go to REI and get about 18" of the thinner elastic shock cord. Tie one end to an eyelet then size the cord to the other eyelet while wearing your new winter boots. Tie it off, you may need to fiddle with it to get it just barely taut. Once done the cord will go under the instep of your boot as you hike, those are now your gaiters. The cord will need to be replaced if you hike on a lot of rocks, but should last at least a season. Fwiw, I haven't used gaiters in almost 20 years, internal gaiters work fine except in sustained postholing in heavier snow. But...that's why you carry snowshoes, right? :lol: Just an idea.

PS: Put a drop of superglue on the knots once you are satisfied with the cord length, that way they won't come loose.

-Tom
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RyGuy
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Re: Warmest but comfortable and long-distance boots

Post by RyGuy » Mon Dec 28, 2020 4:31 pm

blazintoes wrote:
Mon Dec 14, 2020 6:59 am
This is a bit prima donna and high maintenance but to keep feet happy have driving socks and climbing socks. When you get to the TH change out of your driving socks because feet sweat and now your driving socks are damp. You may not feel it, but they are. Then powder your feet with baby powder to keep them dry and change into your clean warm climbing socks. That's my trick, clean dry socks and baby powder.
+ 1 for this. I also change socks right before hitting the trail in winter, that works well. Then I also will use a special (separate) stick of antiperspirant on both feet. That has made a big difference in winter.
"Climbing mountains is the only thing I know that combines the best of the physical, spiritual, and emotional world all rolled into one." -Steve Gladbach
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