Information Entries for Mt. Lincoln

Climbing History (Mt. Democrat)



Title: 4 in one day

Entered by: tthompson

Added: 07/27/2019, Last Updated: 07/27/2019


Under construction

Name History (Mt. Bross)



Title: Naming of Mt. Bross

Entered by: 14erFred

Added: 05/14/2010, Last Updated: 05/14/2010

Sources: Hart, J.L.J. (1977). Fourteen thousand feet: A history of the naming and early ascents of the high Colorado peaks (Second Edition). Denver, CO: The Colorado Mountain Club.

The mountain was named for William Bross (1813-1889), Lieutenant Governor of Illinois from 1865 to 1869, who owned mining property near the town of Alma. Bross made an early ascent of Mount Lincoln in 1868 and was so enthusiastic about the view that he sang the Doxology on the summit. As a consequence, local miners began referring to Lincoln's south peak as Mount Bross, and the name stuck.

Name History (Mt. Cameron)



Title: Naming of Mt. Cameron

Entered by: 14erFred

Added: 05/17/2010, Last Updated: 05/17/2010

Sources: Eicher, D.J. (2001). Civil War High Commands. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press. Hart, J.L.J. (1925). Fourteen thousand feet: A history of the naming and early ascents of the high Colorado peaks (First Edition). Denver, CO: The Colorado Mountain Club.

Although the name "Cameron" was first associated in print with the mountain in 1873, the precise origin of the name remains uncertain. However, two distinct possibilities exist. First, the mountain may have been named for Robert Alexander Cameron (February 22, 1828 - March 15, 1894), who served as a Union general during the American Civil War and helped establish Colorado Agricultural Colonies in Fort Collins and Greeley during the 1870s.

Alternatively -- and perhaps more likely given its proximity to Mount Lincoln -- the mountain may have been named for Simon Cameron (March 8, 1799 - June 26, 1889), Republican senator from Pennsylvania and President Lincoln's first Secretary of War, whom he fired for corruption after Cameron had been in office less than ten months. Allegedly, Lincoln asked Congressman Thaddeus Stevens (also from Pennsylvania) about Cameron's honesty, and Stevens replied, "I do not believe he would steal a red hot stove." Cameron demanded a retraction, so Stevens admitted his statement might have been incorrect.

Cameron is also the namesake of Cameron Cone (10,705 ft.), a mountain summit in El Paso County, and Cameron Pass (10,276 ft.) in north central Colorado.


Name History (Mt. Democrat)



Title: Naming of Mt. Democrat

Entered by: 14erFred

Added: 05/14/2010, Last Updated: 05/14/2010

Sources: Hart, J.L.J. (1977). Fourteen thousand feet: A history of the naming and early ascents of the high Colorado peaks (Second Edition). Denver, CO: The Colorado Mountain Club.

The mountain was originally called Buckskin Peak, after the rip-roaring Buckskin Joe mining camp just northwest of Fairplay. However, it was renamed Democrat by a group of rebellious southern miners during the Civil War, as a statement of political protest against Republican Abraham Lincoln. The name Democrat first appears on the map of the Land Office Survey of 1883.

Name History (Mt. Lincoln)



Title: Naming of Mt. Lincoln

Entered by: 14erFred

Added: 05/27/2010, Last Updated: 05/27/2010

Sources: Borneman, W.R., & Lampert, L.J. (1978). A climbing guide to Colorado's Fourteeners. Boulder, CO: Pruett Publishing Company. Eberhart, P., & Schmuck, P. (1970). The Fourteeners: Colorado's great mountains. Chicago: The Swallow Press. Hart, J.L.J. (1977). Fourteen thousand feet: A history of the naming and early ascents of the high Colorado peaks (Second Edition). Denver, CO: The Colorado Mountain Club. The Colorado Mountain Club Foundation. (2010). The Colorado 14ers: The standard routes. Golden, CO: The Colorado Mountain Club Press.

In 1861, Wilbur F. Stone (who later helped write Colorado's Constitution) named the mountain for the then newly-elected 16th President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 - April 15, 1865). In his survey report of 1873, Ferdinand V. Hayden wrote: "The view from the summit of Mount Lincoln is wonderful in its extent...probably there is no portion of the world, accessible to the traveling public, where such a wilderness of lofty peaks can be seen within a single scope of vision (as from its top)."



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